religion

Four religions, four takes on the afterlife

14 hours ago
Image cropped and reused from @runtaipei under CC license

 

Right now, a person born in this country will live to be 78.8 Years old. Not bad, but life expectancy has actually dropped in the U.S. for the first time in almost a quarter-century. And let’s face it: many of us don’t really think about mortality all that much.

Tom Levy

About 20% of American Muslims are converts — people who didn’t grow up with the religion and often don’t have any cultural ties.

Jaimal Yogis is a San Francisco author who lives at Ocean Beach with his wife and three sons. He spent many years traveling the world seeking spiritual enlightenment. That time is captured in his upcoming book All Our Waves Are Water: Stumbling Toward Enlightenment and the Perfect Ride. Jaimal sat down with a fellow surfer, KALW’s Ben Trefny, to talk about it.

A spiritual haven for African refugees in Kansas City

Apr 11, 2017
Steve Mencher

Mid-February in Kansas City is usually a time for sweaters and scraping ice off your windshield. Not really when you'd expect to be firing up an air pump to inflate a kiddie pool. But the pool, if it holds air and water, may have a higher calling.

The Bay Area has about 250 thousand Muslim residents – more than three percent of the region’s population. But what many people know about Islam is limited to anti-Muslim messages that have come from the highest political office holders.

Commentary: Are all Buddhists atheists?

Dec 2, 2016
Front Group

In the comments on our Nov. 21 story, "Some, None or Done: A Zen Atheist," listeners discussed whether Buddhism is theistic or non-theistic. We asked  John Nelson, a scholar of religion who serves on The Spiritual Edge's academic advisory committee, to help us understand the issue:

Pumping up bodies and spirits at God's Gym

Nov 29, 2016

The training floor of God’s Gym is definitely old school – one room crammed with barbells, benches, and ancient weight machines.

San Quentin Prison Report: A nephew's forgiveness

Sep 21, 2016
Post News Group

    

Tom Levy

If you’re familiar with Black churches you know they’re lively and uplifting places. That’s how San Francisco native Yvette Flunder remembers hers. At the Pentecostal Church she grew up in, she recalls pastors and church leaders who were tender and kind and understanding. That is, until one topic came up.

Incubating progressive leadership in the Black Church

Sep 19, 2016
Photo courtesy of Ben Trefny

 


Mike McBride is pastor of The Way Christian Center in Berkeley. He’s also the Director of Urban Strategies for the PICO National Network of progressive, faith-based organizations.

Philosophy Talk: Do religions deserve special status?

Sep 9, 2016
"Religion billboard" by Dave & Anna Douglass used under cc license

What special status, if any, should religion have in the eyes of the law? 


Courtesy of Aroup Chaterjee

As I sat down to lunch in Kolkata on Sunday, far away in Vatican City, the woman who made Kolkata famous around the world was becoming a saint.

Photo by Sandip Roy

Last week Kolkata was busy celebrating a birthday with flowers, candles, cards and songs.

A shepherd finds the perfect flock

May 10, 2016
Michael Pisais

Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church sits on a quiet residential corner in the outer Sunset district of San Francisco.

Philosophy Talk asks about good, evil, and the divine plan

Dec 22, 2015

What kind of divinity allows its believers to suffer?


Philosophy Talk asks about Taoism

Dec 11, 2015

Is Taoism a religion, a philosophy, a spiritual practice, or a way of life? 


What was so dangerous about Spinoza's ideas that he was ex-communicated for them?


Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

In many African American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

Hana Baba

About 20 Muslim families are gathered on a hilltop outside the Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley, just after sunset. A water fountain bubbles, women and men chat, kids run around with snacks in their hands, and everyone at some point or another, looks up to the sky. They are moonsighting, scanning the sky for the new crescent moon that will signify the beginning of the month, Ramadan. 

Courtesy of Dan Harper

Sacred Harp singing is considered to be one of the oldest forms of American folk music. It dates back to the 1700s, to a choral style that developed in the churches of colonial New England, but eventually took root in the South. It’s a participatory tradition, which means that singers perform for themselves, not for an audience. Today, Sacred Harp is experiencing something of a renaissance, some even characterize it as the punk rock of choral music.

Thomas Walden Levy

The Spiritual Edge is a new reporting project from KALW that explores innovation in religious belief and practice in the Bay Area.  And as we plan the next stage of the project's development, we want your ideas and input.

By answering this brief survey, you'll discover the diverse stories that this project has already told, and help shape the future direction of The Spiritual Edge. Thank you!

 

Elizabeth Beltran-Larios struggled with her identity for much of her childhood. Beltran-Larios was born in Oakland, but she was raised in a small town south of Jalisco, Mexico. Growing up, she felt alienated from the Catholic church because of her sexual orientation. Her exposure to Buddhism in college helped her come to terms with who she is and what she believes. She sat down in the StoryCorps booth to share her story of this transformation.

 

Belief in God is thought by many to be the only possible source of morality, such that without a God, “everything is permitted.” Yet godlessness is on the rise in the West, with figures like Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, and Lawrence Krauss leading the “New Atheism” movement. But if atheism is defined by its lack of belief, where do these non-believers find guiding principles? Are there any positive beliefs or values that atheists have in common? If so, are they based on a rational, scientific framework, or must non-believers, like believers, ultimately rely on faith?

Philosophy Talk asks: Why (not) believe in an afterlife?

Jan 9, 2015

The question of what happens to us after we die remains as mysterious now as it always was. Some think that death amounts to total annihilation of the self; others adhere to certain religious traditions, which teach that the immaterial soul (and, in some traditions, the resurrected body) can ultimately survive death. So how are we to judge between these radically different views of what happens to us in death? What would it mean for the self to persist beyond the destruction of the body? Is there room in a scientific account of the mind for the existence of an immaterial soul?

Hana Baba

While the majority of the world’s Christians celebrate Christmas on December 25th, a number of Orthodox sects follow an older-than-Gregorian calendar. They celebrate every year on January 7th. 

Stopping Workplace Harassment Because of Race, National Origin, Religion.
Guests:  Phil Horowitz, an Advisor to the Executive Committee of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the State Bar; Employment Law attorney Maribel Hernandez.
Listeners with questions for Chuck's guests please call 415-841-4134.

Supersurvivors - Growing from Adversity

Sep 11, 2014

  

 


These days, a lot of people prefer the word “spirituality” over “religion”. Many people associate religion with dogma handed down by inflexible institutions that don’t keep up with the times. 

The Marsh- SF

 

Dezi Gallegos is a playwright who is searching for God. He's only 18 years old, but says he's already lived through numerous tough life experiences that led to him asking the question: is there a loving God? And if so, why are these bad things  plagues, he calls them  happening to me and my family? 

At the Seams: Eli Conley's "folk songs for misfits"

Sep 12, 2013
Sarah Deragon


Eli Conley sings of love, prisons, coal mining, religion, homophobia and leaving Virginia on his new CD At The Seams, an album he calls "modern-day folk songs for misfits." Hear Eli's music and his chat with Out in the Bay host Eric Jansen about his life, his songwriting and how he helps other transgender singers find their voices. 

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