religion

Radio Ambulante: El chamán / The Shaman

May 13, 2013
Flickr user AnnGrlk / CC License

The intense winter rains of 2011 left thousands of Colombians flooded out of their homes and claimed hundreds of lives. That same year, a man named Jorge Elías González became infamous for taking public money to keep the skies clear over Bogotá. Melba Escobar tells us his story.

Las intensas lluvias del invierno del 2011 dejaron a miles de colombianos sin casas y cientos de muertos. Ese mismo año, un hombre llamado Jorge Elías González se volvió famoso por cobrar dineros públicos para mantener el cielo de Bogotá despejado. Melba Escobar nos cuenta su historia.

photo by Stuart Locklear

Meet Bay Area-bred singer, songwriter and keyboard player Mark Etheredge and collaborator Michael Cronin, who play in San Francisco  Saturday, and hear their latest music on this week's Out in the Bay.  Mark has just released his first CD, Change Coming,  featuring a wide range of songs about life and love, from the upbeat and humorous "Hot Tub" and "Pimp You Out for Love" to the very personal and touching "Room to Room,"  about his mother's struggle with Alzheimer's.

http://hrringleader.com/2010/12/13/religion-and-politics-at-work/politics-religion/

Religion has been the social backbone of human civilization for thousands of years.  It helps explain the unexplainable, gives hope to the hopeless, and its places of worship have been the common spaces whose members get to know each other, practice common traditions, build trust, and help each other in an enormous and frightening world.  But what happens when the world gets smaller, and people of different faiths, or no faith at all, live together - and in a democracy none the less? Next week we'll discuss the influence faith-based organizations have on secular society.

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