Roman Mars

Before the 1850s, dentures were made out of very hard, very painful and very expensive material, like gold or ivory. They were a luxury item. The invention of Vulcanite hard rubber changed everything. Everyone began making dentures with Vulcanite bases. But in 1864, a long disputed patent application was acquired by the Goodyear Dental Vulcanite Company, an outfit created to collect fees, or very often, sue dentists who already used vulcanite.  And there were plenty of dentists to go after. 

99% Invisible: "Duplitecture"  The best knock-offs in the world are in China. There are plenty of fake designer handbags and Rolexes but China’s knock-offs go way beyond fashion. There are knock-off Apple stores that look so much like the real thing, some employees believe they are working in real Apple stores.  And then there are entire knock-off cities.

99% Invisible: “Call Now” The subtle, possibly endless civil war over how attorneys should advertise their services (and whether they should advertise at all).

VoiceBox: "Auctioneering"  Inside the rhythm, art and sport of the live auction, with Colorado Auctioneers Hall of Famer Steve Linnebur and Tennessee auctioneer Justin Ochs.

Glen Weldon, author of Superman: The Unauthorized Biography (and panelist of the great Pop Culture Happy Hour) talks us through the iconography of our first superhero and why Supes has managed to stay relevant for 75 years.

Radio producer Sam Greenspan, who works with Roman Mars on "99% Invisible" will share a special mix of extended "99%" episodes never before heard on KALW, plus some of his favorite podcasts.  Tuesday at 11pm.

If you’re not from California, or missed this bit of news, the University of California has a new logo – or, rather, had a new logo. To be more precise they had a new “visual identity system,” which is the kind of entirely accurate but completely wonky description that gets met with sarcastic eye rolls from anyone who isn’t a designer, but there it is. But they don’t have a new logo anymore. Because of a massive public backlash, the UC system actually suspended the monogram while we were reporting this story.

Though its official name is JFK Plaza, the open space near Philadelphia’s City Hall is more commonly known as LOVE Park, after the Robert Indiana sculpture installed there.  Designed by Edmund Bacon and Vincent Kling, the park was fashioned in high modernism:  sleek, granite benches; geometric raised planter beds, and long expanses of pavement.  Its success as a pedestrian plaza is debatable.  

But it turned out to be perfect for skateboarding. 

Though its official name is JFK Plaza, the open space near Philadelphia’s City Hall is more commonly known as LOVE Park, after the Robert Indiana sculpture installed there.  Designed by Edmund Bacon and Vincent Kling, the park was fashioned in high modernism:  sleek, granite benches; geometric raised planter beds, and long expanses of pavement.  Its success as a pedestrian plaza is debatable.  

But it turned out to be perfect for skateboarding. 

Though its official name is JFK Plaza, the open space near Philadelphia’s City Hall is more commonly known as LOVE Park, after the Robert Indiana sculpture installed there.  Designed by Edmund Bacon and Vincent Kling, the park was fashioned in high modernism:  sleek, granite benches; geometric raised planter beds, and long expanses of pavement.  Its success as a pedestrian plaza is debatable.  

But it turned out to be perfect for skateboarding. 

Greg Girard

In 1898, China granted a 99-year lease to Great Britain for the areas across the harbor in the British controlled island of Hong Kong. But smack in the middle of that territory, known as Kowloon, was an enclave that wasn't included in the lease. A place that would, at least officially, still be controlled by the Chinese. It was a large fort, built decades earlier to put a check on British expansion. But it evolved into something very, very different. 

Check out Wired.com's new feature on Roman Mars and 99% Invisible, the tiny show about design that started at KALW, has since had more than 2 million downloads on iTunes, and is currently in the midst of a hugely successful Kickstarter fundraising campaign.

Roman Mars was given this song on a mix tape when he was a teenager.

Composting is just one way we’re thinking about reducing waste, and when it works, we notice: landfills slim down, and gardens bulk up. But then there’s the waste that doesn’t take up space, like energy.

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