Roman Mars

On this week's episode of 99% Invisible:

You see them on street corners, at gas stations, at shopping malls. You see them at blowout sales and grand openings of all kinds. Their wacky faces hover over us, and then fall down to meet us, and then rise up again. Their bodies flop. They flail.  They are men. Men made of tubes. Tubes full of air.

Friday at 7:45am & 4:45pm and Saturday at 8:35am.

James Davies

On this week's episode of 99% Invisible:

“A Chair is a difficult object. A skyscraper is almost easier.” — Mies van der Rohe.

The chair presents an interesting design challenge, because it is an object that disappears when in use. The person replaces the chair. So chairs need to look fantastic when empty, and remain invisible (and comfortable) while in use.

Friday at 7:45am & 4:45pm and Saturday at 8:35am.

On this week's episode of 99% Invisible:

Winning an early pinball game was much more about luck than skill, since there were no buttons to activate flippers on the sides. You basically had one action: pull the plunger and watch the ball go. Without the flippers, pinball was a truly a game of chance—perfect for gambling.

Friday at 7:45am & 4:45pm, Saturday at 8:35am.

99% Invisible: Unbuilt

Dec 12, 2014

On this week's episode of 99% Invisible:

There is an allure to unbuilt structures: the utopian, futuristic transports; the impossibly tall skyscrapers; even the horrible highways. They all capture our imagination with what could have been.  Producer Sam Greenspan spoke with Andrew Lynch (aka Vanshnookenraggen), creator of Hyperreal Cartography, a Tumblr of unbuilt cities across the globe.

On this week's episode of 99% Invisible:

Near the end of World War II, architects were anticipating the post-war housing shortage. Wallace Neff was L.A.'s start architect at the time, and wanted to create a solution that would not only meet this demand, but address the need for housing worldwide.

99% Invisible: Wonder Bread

Nov 28, 2014

The first print advertisement for Wonder Bread came out before the bread itself. It stated only that “a wonder” was coming. In a lot of ways, the statement was true. Wonder Bread was the perfect loaf. “Slow food” advocates have pronounced industrial white bread of any brand a symbol of a modern grocery problem: consumers don’t know where our food comes from. The funny thing is that industrial white bread—that evenly sliced, squishy, moist, perfectly white and wondrous loaf—was once a highly designed solution to that very same problem.

The best of the best in new radio, winners of the Third Coast Festival Competition.  Award-winning writer, producer and humorist Gwen Macsai is host.  You’ll also hear interviews with winning producers and excerpts from the Third Coast Awards Ceremony, hosted by Roman Mars. 

The best of the best in new radio, winners of the Third Coast Festival Competition.  Award-winning writer, producer and humorist Gwen Macsai is host.  You’ll also hear interviews with winning producers and excerpts from the Third Coast Awards Ceremony, hosted by Roman Mars. 

On this week's episode of 99% Invisible:

The Ouija board is so simple and iconic that it looks like it comes from another time, or maybe another realm. The game is not as ancient as it was designed to look, but those two arched rows of letters have been spooking people for over 125 years.  To understand where Ouija boards (generically called “talking boards”) come from, you have to go back to middle of the 1800s, to three sisters in New York.

On this week's episode of 99% Invisible:

The “driveway moment.” It’s when a story is so good that you can’t leave your car. Inside of a driveway moment, time becomes elastic–you could be staring straight at a clock for the entire duration of the story, but for that length of time, the clock has no power over you.

But ironically,  inside the machinery of public radio–the industry that creates driveway moments–the clock rules all.

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