San Francisco Giants

The Bridge: Behind the scenes at AT&T Park

Jul 22, 2016
Kyle Trefny

We hear two stories from the home of the San Francisco Giants - AT&T Park. First, we meet the Spanish-language broadcast team of the Giants -  or Los Gigantes - and then we spend time with the man who keeps the ballpark organ pipes singing.

Candlestick memory: Caroline Hickson

May 15, 2015
From Flickr user Kimberly Brown-Azzarello.

As a child in the 60’s, Caroline Hickson rode the bus with a friend all the way to Candlestick Park to watch Giants baseball games.

Photo by Chris Hoff

Good organ music can be a religious experience, especially when it's written by composers like Johann Sebastian Bach, and played on massive organs with over 10,000 pipes.

But then there's another kind of organ music, played in a different type of cathedral, on a small Hammond organ. This is the music of Steve Hogan, organist for the San Francisco Giants.

Ben Trefny

Visiting AT&T Park before the San Francisco Giants host a World Series game provides a fascinating juxtaposition of feelings. It's all about anticipation.

Dave Fleishman

Yes, it's that time of year, again. That time of an even-numbered year, anyway. The San Francisco Giants are in the World Series, and we're listening to their Bluegrass Fight Song, performed by Hot Buttered Rum. They've got a gig coming up Friday night at Moe's Alley in Santa Cruz starting right about the time game three between the Giants and Royals wraps up.

San Francisco's "Field of Greens" at AT&T Park

Sep 29, 2014
San Francisco Giants

Behind a wall in a park in San Francisco, there’s a large and thriving vegetable garden. That might not seem like such a big deal. But the park is AT&T Park, the wall is the centerfield wall, and the veggies that grow there are served up to hungry fans of the San Francisco Giants.

Audrey Dilling

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

HANA BABA: Sports aren’t for everyone. And baseball, in particular, can be a hard sell. The baseball season has 162 games, and these games feel like they last forever – the players always seem to do a lot of standing around and spitting, never much actual playing.

So why is it the national pastime? Any fan might tell you it’s about the skill of the game – strategy combined with athleticism.

But it’s more than that.

JON MILLER: My dad was a baseball fan, a sports fan, and in those days the games were on the radio. And he always had a ballgame on the radio.

San Francisco's District 5 Supervisor, Christina Olague, has requested a hearing to examine neighborhood recycling scavenging. Since 2010 Recology and the city have looked into how to stop the activity, which costs up to $5 million in revenue annually. The hearing should take place in April before the board’s City Operations and Neighborhood Services Committee...