San Francisco

Daily news roundup for Thursday, February 5, 2015

Feb 5, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

OPD Still Appears to be Targeting Blacks // East Bay Express

Tom Nolan on Gay Seniors

Feb 5, 2015

For almost two decades, Tom Nolan ran Project Open Hand, a meal service created during the AIDS crisis.  He's now chairman of the MUNI board. But his passion is gay rights, specifically the plight of the city's gay seniors.   What kinds of challenges do they face that others don't? You might be surprised. Marilyn Pittman talks with Tom about the findings of the LGBT Aging Policy Task Force. Thursday, February 5, 2015, at 7pm on kalw.org and 91.7fm. 

Learning how to play on San Francisco’s streets

Feb 4, 2015
Photo credit: Marlo McKenzie

Every year, over the course of a weekend, San Francisco’s Civic Center is transformed into a giant playground. Except this playground is for children of all ages who’ve hit the streets to take part in San Francisco’s Come Out & Play Festival.  

Illustration by Greg Palena

 

There was a man who stopped eating. Not because of his health or weight or spirituality. He was saving his appetite for a big feast that was one week away.

Why am I telling you this?

Sam Spade is the private eye in The Maltese Falcon, the San Francisco detective novel that’s been mystifying readers for almost a century. Dashiell Hammett’s hard-boiled page turner came out in 1930. In it, detective Sam Spade gets caught up in a frantic search for a mysterious gold and jewel encrusted statuette known as the Maltese Falcon. The bird has been covered with a layer of black enamel to mask its true value.

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear from Tomas Moniz a writer living in Oakland - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of San Francisco’s literary scene. Find more litography stories here

Casey Miner

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Jan 28, 2015
Bert Johnson / East Bay Express

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Artists Create Two-Way Video Portal for Oaklanders to Meet Their Neighbors // East Bay Express

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Jan 27, 2015
Leah Millis / San Francisco Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Psychology studies suggest rising wealth means more jerks in S.F. // SF Gate

"If it seems that San Franciscans are getting more entitled and self-absorbed, a series of psychology studies performed at UC Berkeley indicates there could be a scientific reason: the city’s increasing wealth.

For as long as she could remember, Suzanne Thompson wanted to be a mom, but she was running out of time. She thought of her friend Christopher Noessel and his partner Benjamin Remington, who always wanted to be dads, and then she had an idea that could maybe give them all the chance to be parents...together. To make sure their future child wasn’t confused, they sat down with StoryCorps and made this tape for their son, Miles, while he was still in utero. 

In "Poly Love," Julia Scott reports on polyamory in the Bay Area

Jan 26, 2015
Brett Walker / San Francisco Magazine

Polyamory is a committed romantic relationship -- with more than one person. San Francisco Magazine’s new issue features a story about the poly community -- while many on the outside see them as swingers in disguise, the article’s author, Julia Scott, says many polyamorous relationships are more cerebral than they are sexy. For the podcast The Back Story, Julia Scott sat down with host Leah Rose to talk about reporting on polyamory. 

The New Face of Out Comedy

Jan 22, 2015

  

Janine Brito is Marilyn's guest this week on "Out In The Bay," gay radio from San Francisco now celebrating its 10th year. Best known for her hilarious rants on the FX TV show, "Totally Biased,"  (starring San Francisco's own W. Kamau Bell),  Janine proved that at least some lesbians can be funny. She's in San Francisco for SFSketchfest, the annual two-week multi-venue comedy event. Thursday, January 22nd, at 7pm Pacific, right after "Fresh Air."  http://www.janinebrito.com 

Under CC license from Flickr user Beatrice Murch

In San Francisco’s Richmond District, where Geary Boulevard meets Park Presidio, there stands a bright, white, defunct Christian Science church. There are big white columns out front, with pink steps leading up to iron double doors.

But, what goes on inside this church is not quite what you’d expect.

Thomas Hawk / via Flickr, Creative Commons license

Last September we aired a piece by Todd Oppenheimer on how hard it is for small business owners to get through the permitting process here in San Francisco

A few of you called in with recommendations for other business owners to talk to, including Ted Loewenberg. He's the president of the Haight Ashbury Improvement Association and he says small businesses owners face a Sisyphean task. 

Nellie Large

Seafarers, from fisherman to explorers, have been coming to Bay Area ports for centuries. Maritime historian Lincoln Paine says our relationship with the ocean has been instrumental in shaping not only the history of the Bay Area, but of the entire world. His latest book, Sea and Civilization: A Maritime History of the World, charts 3,500 years of maritime commerce and discovery. KALW's Hana Baba spoke with him about the importance of the sea and its formative role in creating the bustling cities surrounding the Bay.

99% Invisible: Forgotten

Jan 2, 2015

At the top of Mt. Olympus in San Francisco, on what was once thought to be the geographic center of the city, is a pedestal for a statue that isn’t there. There’s no marker.

Trannyshack Transforms Into Mother

Dec 25, 2014

  

Drag impresario Heklina, of "Trannyshack" fame, has revitalized what used to be the hot corner of the gay male club scene in the '70s and '80s.  It was called Oasis and came complete with swimming pool, showers, and towels back then.  She's keeping that name and opening the new space on New Year's Eve.  Her new drag show, "Mother," opens on January 17th.  Heklina talks with Marilyn Pittman (broadcast Thursday, December 25th)

22nd Annual Kung Pao Kosher Comedy

Dec 18, 2014

  

"What are Jews supposed to do on Christmas?"  Eric Jansen's guest on Out in the Bay Thursday night, comic Lisa Geduldig, says it's an age-old question that she answered 21 years ago with her now annual show Kung Pao Kosher Comedy, Jewish comedians telling jokes in a Chinese restaurant on Christmas, Christmas Eve, and this year, Boxing Day, too. Two shows nightly this year feature NPR program host Ophira Eisenberg,14-year-old Simon Cadel (Kung Pao's youngest comic ever), Jeremy Hotz and Lisa Geduldig, who also serves as Master of Ceremonies.  Hear a taste of all four comedians on tonight's Out in the Bay, and about Kung Pao Kosher Comedy's history and a little bit of San Francisco's queer history from producer Geduldig. (Airs 7pm Thursday, Dec. 18.)

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Spreckels Lake

Dec 18, 2014

 

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

San Francisco has a rich history, with many groups claiming a piece of it. There’s the California Historical Society, and the Society of California Pioneers - which are not to be confused with the San Francisco Museum & Historical Society (SFMHS). Additionally, many ethnic groups and neighborhoods in the City preserve specific aspects of our past. Our history is a big draw for out-of-towners.

Maya de Paula Hanika

In 2002, Juan Carlos Cancino, was riding his bike around town and found an entire city block of dilapidated greenhouses, near a hill in the Portola called University Mound.

“You step inside them and immediately it’s warmer,” Cancino says. “It’s quieter, the birds are chirping. You smell the flowers and there’s the crunch of earth under your feet.”

How the biggest storm in years affected the Bay

Dec 11, 2014
Ben Trefny


Today’s storm disrupted lives up and down the Bay Area, knocking down trees, flooding roadways, and cutting power to tens of thousands of people.

Liz Mak

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Jeremy Dalmas

 

In a quiet spot, just west of the bustle of the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, sits a garden dedicated to English literature’s crowned prince: William Shakespeare. Once you make it past the entrance gate and down the worn brick path, you are transported into an English garden filled with manicured flower beds, trimmed lawns, and people escaping the noise of the city.

  

 

 

On the December 9th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we're discussing creative responses to displacement. Median rent in San Francisco is over $3,000 a month. The city is now one of the most unequal urban areas in the country. Many long-term renters have been evicted. From 2000 to 2010, San Francisco’s black population dropped by 19 percent. What place does art have in the fight against gentrification? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

 Guests:

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: The Church of Coltrane

Dec 4, 2014

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

This auditory guessing game is part of our project, Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the sonic signature of each of the Bay Area’s nine counties. By using the sounds of voices, nature, industry, and music, Audiograph tells the story of where you live, and the people who live there with you. Every Thursday, we reveal the origins of that week's sound on Crosscurrents, and here in weekly blog posts.

Listen above for the full answer... 

Some of all Parts, is a San Francisco rap group made up of old high school buddies Carlos Teasdale, Daniel Velarde, and Joe Truss. Truss is Assistant Principal at San Francisco’s Academy of Arts and Science. He says he was skeptical about joining a rap group at first. He wasn’t impressed with a lot of mainstream rap out there at the time.

Laura Klivans

Over the past few years, San Francisco has been getting a lot of press about the tensions in our quickly changing city. It all seems to be magnified in San Francisco’s Mission District: a sunny destination with a growing number of expensive restaurants and rent prices. It’s a neighborhood where Mark Zuckerberg now owns a home, and a place where an affluent, whiter population is displacing lower-income residents, many of them Latino.

Preparing for the SF International Hip Hop DanceFest

Nov 13, 2014
Allan Frias

 

It’s 10 p.m. on a Monday night and I am at a dance studio in San Francisco's Mission District. About 25 members of the dance company Mind Over Matter, mostly women, are finishing their warm up. Dressed in comfy street clothes, they stretch while they chat. They are rehearsing for the San Francisco International Hip Hop DanceFest, which kicks off this weekend.

Ellis Act evictions: Gum Gee Lee

Nov 10, 2014
Melanie Young

The Lees are an elderly immigrant couple who live with their disabled adult daughter. The new owner of their building evicted them to convert their apartment into tenancies-in-common.

“People call me Mrs. Lee. The owner provided a notice to me. Using the Ellis Act to evict me.

“Initially, it was really hard for me. Because on one hand, aside from them moving out, it was really difficult because I heard a lot of noise and banging from construction because the landlord is doing a lot of renovations.

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