San Francisco

To many Americans, Falafel is a fried ball of mashed up garbanzo beans that you can put in a sandwich. But to me, falafel reminds me of where I’m from – Sudan. Until recently, I thought there was really only one way to make it. But it turns out, there are many ways to fry a falafel, depending on where you’re from – and of course, everyone thinks their way is best. So I headed out around the Bay on a falafel shop hop.

There are at least 7,000 homeless people in San Francisco each night, and only enough shelter space to house a small fraction of them. This is one of the reasons San Francisco recently held the first Town Hall to End Homelessness in which city officials and community leaders renewed their commitment to do just that.

But if you’re going to talk ways to end homelessness in San Francisco, why not start by talking to the people with the most experience?

transmitdistort

Statewide forums seek input… Emerald Triangle now favors legalization… CBD & Kids: does it really work?... and more.

LEGALIZATION

Public input requested at forums // Reuters.com  Focus will be on three areas: legalization, taxation, and regulation. The first meeting is April 21 at UCLA, followed by one in San Francisco in May and ending with one in Fresno in June.

Olivia Cueva / Kalw

 

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

This auditory guessing game is part of our project, Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the sonic signature of each of the Bay Area’s nine counties. By using the sounds of voices, nature, industry, and music, Audiograph tells the story of where you live, and the people who live there with you. Every Thursday, we reveal the origins of that week's sound on Crosscurrents, and here in weekly blog posts.

Listen above for the full answer...

"Passion" shows LGBT choral music's evolving role

Mar 26, 2015

What's the role of gay and lesbian choruses today? The SF Gay Men’s Chorus first performed in 1978 after the murder of gay San Francisco supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone that morning. Three years later, they toured the USA, inspiring dozens of gay and lesbian choruses to form. These groups provided cultural voice and safe social connections for LGBT people, especially in small towns and away from the coasts.

Flickr user toyzrus8

The Hetch Hetchy Regional Water system, operated by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (PUC), carries water to 2.6 million customers in the Bay Area. How it does that is remarkable – remarkably simple, says PUC Water Resources Manager, David Briggs.

Audrey DIlling

A couple on an evening stroll down Valencia Street comes to a stop outside Lost Weekend Video. They’re peering in through the big front window.

“I wanted to check it out because I haven’t seen a video store in a long time,” says Abel Martinez. “These days I watch a lot of pirated movies.”

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


The Best of Out In The Bay: Life Before The Lifeboat

Mar 12, 2015

  

AIDS led the world to many new discoveries in medicine. But San Francisco's General Hospital pioneered a new model of patient care. In the film, "Life Before The Lifeboat,"  Dr. Paul Volberding interviews nurses, doctors, medical professionals, and community leaders from that time. Marilyn's audio version of the film is a compelling, dramatic, intense listening experience. A special rebroadcast Thursday, March 12th, 2015, at 7pm. 

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Barbara Comyns's Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead from Colin Winnette, a writer living in San Francisco. 

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of the Bay Area’s literary scene. Find more Litography stories here

 

How does citizen oversight of police departments work?  On the next Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by discussing different models in Northern California. Where is citizen oversight working? San Diego, Oakland, Riverside, Long Beach, Sausalito, Novato, and Berkeley have review boards, but few people know these boards even exist. What power do citizen oversight boards have to ensure police accountability? How should these boards work? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/

 

Alyssa Arian has worked in San Francisco restaurants for a decade and, like most servers, she got into it for the tips.

“Some nights you leave with $80 or $90,” she says. “$100 is kind of the average mark for what you want as a server, sort of anywhere in this city I think as a minimum.”

Since February, though, Arian hasn’t earned any tips. She’s working at Sous Beurre Kitchen, a new French spot in the Mission where tipping’s not allowed.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, March 5th

Mar 5, 2015
Laura Wenus

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Marcy Fraser / KALW

 


Jacqueline Cooper is a lot like you.

“I'm not any different than anybody else,” she says. “I'm a mother, I'm a daughter, I'm a sister, a wife at one point.”

However, there’s more to her than that. For one, she’s a retired United States Marine Corps sergeant. For another, she’s dealt with mental illness throughout her life.

Gary Kamiya meets San Francisco's "Outsiders"

Mar 3, 2015

 

The latest count of homeless individuals in San Francisco revealed that 6,436 people in the city are without a home. That is a number that has barely changed over the past few years, even though the city spends more than 165 million dollars a year on homeless services.

  

Marilyn Pittman's and Eric Jansen's 2007 interview with the late singer Lesley Gore. Discovered by Quincy Jones, Gore's iconic, "It's My Party and I'll Cry If I Want To" and "You Don't Own Me," became classic hits. Hear about how she came out and who helped her do it, and how she brought new life to her old hits decades later.  (Broadcast February 19, 2015)

Marilyn Pittman's sound portrait of the late great disco diva Sylvester. Josh Gamson talks with Marilyn and reads from his biography, "The Fabulous Sylvester." We hear from fans at the book party launch in 2005 at the The Center and live concert footage with Sylvester and The Weather Girls, Martha Wash and Izora Rhodes. (Broadcast February 26, 2015)

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Feb 25, 2015
Nicole A. West / Oakland North

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 415, meet 628: New S.F. area code debuts Saturday // SF Gate

Robert Fried at leiros202 through Creative Commons at Flickr

One of the men who helped make Janis Joplin a household name died Thursday. Sam Andrew was a founder and guitarist for Big Brother and the Holding Company. The San Francisco band gained fame in the mid-1960s as part of the city’s psychedelic rock scene.


This is the story about a small business that helps San Francisco’s LGBTQ community and its friends get around the city in style. It’s called Homobiles, and it's a non-commercial, volunteer, 24/7 car service.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, February 5, 2015

Feb 5, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

OPD Still Appears to be Targeting Blacks // East Bay Express

Tom Nolan on Gay Seniors

Feb 5, 2015

For almost two decades, Tom Nolan ran Project Open Hand, a meal service created during the AIDS crisis.  He's now chairman of the MUNI board. But his passion is gay rights, specifically the plight of the city's gay seniors.   What kinds of challenges do they face that others don't? You might be surprised. Marilyn Pittman talks with Tom about the findings of the LGBT Aging Policy Task Force. Thursday, February 5, 2015, at 7pm on kalw.org and 91.7fm. 

Learning how to play on San Francisco’s streets

Feb 4, 2015
Photo credit: Marlo McKenzie

Every year, over the course of a weekend, San Francisco’s Civic Center is transformed into a giant playground. Except this playground is for children of all ages who’ve hit the streets to take part in San Francisco’s Come Out & Play Festival.  

Illustration by Greg Palena

 

There was a man who stopped eating. Not because of his health or weight or spirituality. He was saving his appetite for a big feast that was one week away.

Why am I telling you this?

Sam Spade is the private eye in The Maltese Falcon, the San Francisco detective novel that’s been mystifying readers for almost a century. Dashiell Hammett’s hard-boiled page turner came out in 1930. In it, detective Sam Spade gets caught up in a frantic search for a mysterious gold and jewel encrusted statuette known as the Maltese Falcon. The bird has been covered with a layer of black enamel to mask its true value.

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear from Tomas Moniz a writer living in Oakland - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of San Francisco’s literary scene. Find more litography stories here

Casey Miner

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Jan 28, 2015
Bert Johnson / East Bay Express

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Artists Create Two-Way Video Portal for Oaklanders to Meet Their Neighbors // East Bay Express

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Jan 27, 2015
Leah Millis / San Francisco Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Psychology studies suggest rising wealth means more jerks in S.F. // SF Gate

"If it seems that San Franciscans are getting more entitled and self-absorbed, a series of psychology studies performed at UC Berkeley indicates there could be a scientific reason: the city’s increasing wealth.

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