San Francisco

Liz Mak

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Jeremy Dalmas

 

In a quiet spot, just west of the bustle of the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, sits a garden dedicated to English literature’s crowned prince: William Shakespeare. Once you make it past the entrance gate and down the worn brick path, you are transported into an English garden filled with manicured flower beds, trimmed lawns, and people escaping the noise of the city.

  

 

 

On the December 9th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we're discussing creative responses to displacement. Median rent in San Francisco is over $3,000 a month. The city is now one of the most unequal urban areas in the country. Many long-term renters have been evicted. From 2000 to 2010, San Francisco’s black population dropped by 19 percent. What place does art have in the fight against gentrification? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

 Guests:

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: The Church of Coltrane

Dec 4, 2014

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

This auditory guessing game is part of our project, Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the sonic signature of each of the Bay Area’s nine counties. By using the sounds of voices, nature, industry, and music, Audiograph tells the story of where you live, and the people who live there with you. Every Thursday, we reveal the origins of that week's sound on Crosscurrents, and here in weekly blog posts.

Listen above for the full answer... 

Some of all Parts, is a San Francisco rap group made up of old high school buddies Carlos Teasdale, Daniel Velarde, and Joe Truss. Truss is Assistant Principal at San Francisco’s Academy of Arts and Science. He says he was skeptical about joining a rap group at first. He wasn’t impressed with a lot of mainstream rap out there at the time.

Laura Klivans

Over the past few years, San Francisco has been getting a lot of press about the tensions in our quickly changing city. It all seems to be magnified in San Francisco’s Mission District: a sunny destination with a growing number of expensive restaurants and rent prices. It’s a neighborhood where Mark Zuckerberg now owns a home, and a place where an affluent, whiter population is displacing lower-income residents, many of them Latino.

Preparing for the SF International Hip Hop DanceFest

Nov 13, 2014
Allan Frias

 

It’s 10 p.m. on a Monday night and I am at a dance studio in San Francisco's Mission District. About 25 members of the dance company Mind Over Matter, mostly women, are finishing their warm up. Dressed in comfy street clothes, they stretch while they chat. They are rehearsing for the San Francisco International Hip Hop DanceFest, which kicks off this weekend.

Ellis Act evictions: Gum Gee Lee

Nov 10, 2014
Melanie Young

The Lees are an elderly immigrant couple who live with their disabled adult daughter. The new owner of their building evicted them to convert their apartment into tenancies-in-common.

“People call me Mrs. Lee. The owner provided a notice to me. Using the Ellis Act to evict me.

“Initially, it was really hard for me. Because on one hand, aside from them moving out, it was really difficult because I heard a lot of noise and banging from construction because the landlord is doing a lot of renovations.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/fimoculous/

Soda is so tasty, but so not good for you. One can of coke has about 10 teaspoons of sugar, and too much sugar leads to obesity, diabetes and a host of other health problems.

Widespread diabetes compelled Mexico to pass a national tax on sugary soft drinks last year, but in the U.S. it has yet to happen. That may change tomorrow, if Berkeley or San Francisco passes respective measures that would levy taxes on distributors of sugar-sweetened beverages.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/81016120@N05/

San Francisco paints itself as a green city, a city of walkers and bicyclists, a transportation friendly city. But some say San Francisco has taken its pro-pedestrian stance too far.

A group called the Restore Transportation Balance Coalition wants to take back the roads. That’s the goal of Proposition L, a declaration of policy to make the city’s parking meters, garages and traffic laws more car-friendly. But at what cost?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuckincustoms/

Real estate markets run in cycles, and right now our regional market is soaring. While the national median price for a home is just over $200,000, the median price paid for a home in the nine-county Bay Area last month was just about $600,000.

Artist Martha Villa makes up her city

Oct 28, 2014
Photo courtesy of San Francisco Zombie Prom.

From the outside, Martha Villa’s home blends in with the other modest buildings in her quiet Outer Richmond neighborhood.

Under CC license from Flickr user Jon Starbuck.

KALW’s Liz Pfeffer speaks with Hana Baba about housing-related measures on the upcoming San Francisco ballot, including Propositions K and G.

 

On October 22nd, the Second District PTA hosted a forum featuring eight candidates for three seats on San Francisco's Board of Education.

The forum was moderated by San Francisco Chronicle Education Reporter Jill Tucker, and was co-hosted by Parents for Public Schools of San Francisco, San Francisco Education Fund, Support For Families Of Children With Disabilities, and the San Francisco Parent Political Action Committee.

Ben Trefny

Visiting AT&T Park before the San Francisco Giants host a World Series game provides a fascinating juxtaposition of feelings. It's all about anticipation.

 

So you want to open a bookstore? Excellent news. Here's your guide to survival:

Allen Temple Arms, East Oakland

 

Mary Butler is a person who "likes to keep very busy and independent."

She worked as a respiratory nurse for most of her adult life. After retiring in the early 2000s, she supported herself the way retirees are meant to: with a small pension and social security. She moved to Las Vegas for a while to take care of an ill sibling. When she moved back to Oakland, she couldn’t find a place to rent. Her retirement funds didn’t stack up.

Under CC license from Flickr user Ken Lund.

 

Thuylynh Nguyen’s family came to the U.S. from Vietnam in order to escape political persecution. Her father had spent eight years as a prisoner of war after serving as a soldier in the South Vietnamese army. The U.S. granted her family asylum in 1991.

 

We don’t build housing projects like we used to anymore. It used to be big, labyrinthine complexes like Marcy Houses in New York, Cabrini Green in Chicago, and Geneva Towers in San Francisco. Today, conversations about development have to do with mixed-use, mixed-income communities. 

http://www.pyatok.com

 

'When we say “affordable housing” we're actually using a precisely defined concept. "Affordable", in this context, means housing that costs no more than 30 percent of a household’s income.

Tonny Villarreal

Note: This article contains language some readers may find offensive.

Usually, people who emerge from the 16th Street BART Station in San Francisco are greeted by men and women slumped over shopping carts, by panhandlers, and by the cacophony of traffic. But late on Thursday nights, BART passengers stride into the sounds of poetry. For over a decade, poets, musicians, and comedians have been meeting outside the station.

In  Marin County the  Mill Valley Film Fest  is underway. It opens Thursday October 2, and this week we're featuring some of the many local documentary makers in this year’s program.

Today, we explore the film FREE, which follows young dance students at Destiny Arts in Oakland as they navigate harsh realities like abuse, violence, suicide attempts, and absent parents, all while preparing for a big dance performance that compels them to express their innermost fears. Director Suzanne Lafetra came to the studio, to talk about the film. A note to our listeners, this interview contains a description rape.

Under CC license from Flickr user Taber Andrew Bain

It all started a couple of years ago, when a happy-go-lucky guy I swim with named Joe Omran showed up at Aquatic Park one day in a foul mood. Thirty years ago, he bought a small grocery and deli on the western edge of Nob Hill called Le Beau Market. Now he wanted to open a café nearby. Just a little one.

Isabel Angell

Part of getting older means you can’t get around like you used to. Maybe you can’t drive a car anymore, or hike up those big San Francisco hills to catch the bus.

A Nepali soup kitchen for the soul

Sep 22, 2014
Rachel Wong


 
Around 5pm on a cold, windy Tuesday, an eclectic mix of people stand in a long line at Civic Center’s UN Plaza in San Francisco, waiting patiently. Some have big travel backpacks, a couple have tough-looking dogs, and a few are dressed like they just came from work. Suddenly a bright orange and yellow minivan arrives at the plaza. A team of volunteers wearing orange aprons emerge and quickly set up tents, tables, and giant, metal vats of steaming food. The food smells of ginger and garlic.

Out In The Bay 9/18/14

Sep 18, 2014

Interview with Rick Shelton, aka Lola Montez.

Back in the early part of the 20th century, San Francisco’s North Beach was a Mecca of accordion building (and playing) in the United States. And the accordion is San Francisco’s official city instrument.

Vince Cirelli was an Italian American accordion repairman in his 90s, and Skyler Fell, a woman in her early 30s, worked as his apprentice. Tattooed, pierced, and part of the “steam punk,” DIY, Burning Man scenes, Fell now owns her own accordion repair shop in San Francisco, where she says an “Accordion Revolution” is happening among people of all ages.


San Franciscans love to garden, but a backyard is hard to come by if you live in an apartment. And the 36 city-operated community gardens have wait lists with hundreds of names on them.

That’s why the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department had to get creative on the Golden Gate Park Community Garden. 

Ben Trefny

 

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, San Francisco passed a variety of measures to help low wage workers try to keep up with the rising cost of living. The city now has the highest minimum wage in the country at 10 dollars 74 cents an hour. It also requires employers to either provide health benefits or pay into a pool so the city can cover their health care costs.

SF Public Press

San Francisco's housing crisis has been making headlines for a while now. It’s hard to avoid the numerous news reports on skyrocketing rent prices, controversial evictions, or horror stories of terrible housing situations. But, there’s been far less coverage of what actual solutions there might be for these issues.

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