San Francisco

photo courtesy of The Good Bad

Today’s local music is by a San Francisco band — The Good Bad. They’ve been playing “new grass/bluegrass” since 2010 and pride themselves on having “a mesmerizing stage presence.”

Rich Blaisdell

You’ve just given birth to the most perfect little human. You name him after your father, and his father before him. On the birth certificate, you spell it just like it’s always been spelled, with an accent mark over the i. Then Gisela Sanchez comes along.

Jeremy Jue

 

Right now, in such a divided country, how we connect with others is on many people’s minds. Maybe you go to church every Sunday, maybe you’re in a book club, or a hiking group, or have a favorite yoga class. Or maybe you spend your weekends dueling friends at a small shop in San Francisco’s Portola district.

CC Flickr user Kim Unertl, resized and cropped

Many students, parents, staffers, and administrators associated with schools throughout the Bay Area have expressed concerns about how President Trump’s executive order to increase enforcement of federal immigration laws may affect undocumented students.

We have a few suggestions for you on what to do around our Bay Area this weekend.

Today’s music is by The Conspiracy of Beards. They’re a local male choir that performs a-cappella versions of songs by Leonard Cohen.

Sights & Sounds: Sahba Aminikia

Feb 2, 2017

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene. Composer Sahba Aminikia told KALW’s Jen Chien about three fantastic arts events happening around the Bay this weekend.

StoryCorps

In 1996, when San Francisco's Presidio was decommissioned as an army base and turned into a national park, a man named Eric Blind came to work there as an AmeriCorps volunteer. Blind recalls at the time that the dilapidated Presidio was like a “ghost town.” 

GEORGE GASCON TALK USF IMAGE BY FLIKR USER SHAWN, WITH CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE.

 

If you can’t afford bail in this country, you get stuck in jail until your trial. Many have said it’s a system that's biased against the poor.

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Casting Club

Jan 26, 2017
Photo by Ian Lewis

Here's the sound we played as a clue. We asked you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it. 

Sights & Sounds: Deuce Eclipse

Jan 26, 2017
Odell Hussey / cropped and resized

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene. Deuce Eclipse, vocalist for local band Bang Data, told KALW’s Jen Chien about three cool arts events happening around the Bay this weekend.

Todd Rosenberg

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with conductor Alasdair Neale and composer Mason Bates, about this coming weekend’s concerts by the Marin Symphony featuring Bates’ ‘Devils Radio’, and violinist Midori playing Benjamin Britten’s Violin Concerto.

The music you’re hearing now is being performed by the Chamber Music Society of San Francisco. This group has a passion for playing in intimate settings, which brings performers and listeners closer together.

Jason Clark, the chairman of the San Francisco Republican Party, is optimistic about the new administration despite the vitriol of the campaign. Clark, who is gay, spoke with KALW's Julie Caine about President Trump's position on LGBTQ rights and "coming out" as a Republican.

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: The Stud

Jan 12, 2017
Meradith Hoddinott

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

musicapacifica.org cropped & editted with permission

Have you ever experienced “enormous musicality?”  That’s one way critics describe Musica Pacifica, who you’re hearing now.

Marty Sohl

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with composer Stephen Eddins, whose one-act chamber opera ‘Why I live at the P.O.’ is part of West Edge Opera’sSnapshot’ program on January 21st and 22nd, featuring excerpts from new operas by both emerging and established Northern California composers in intimate concert settings. West Edge’s General Director Mark Streshinsky joins us to explain.

Today’s Local Music: “Black Map”

Jan 11, 2017

The music you’re hearing now is by Black Map, a trio from San Francisco. They call their musical style “American post-hardcore.” Black Map appears on Friday the 13th at The Fillmore in San Francisco. Doors open at 7 p.m.

It’s going to be wet and stormy in the Bay Area this weekend. We have a few recommendations on special events happening, rain or shine.

Under CC license from Flickr user Beatrice Murch

In San Francisco’s Richmond District, where Geary Boulevard meets Park Presidio, there stands a bright, white, defunct Christian Science church. There are big white columns out front, with pink steps leading up to iron double doors.

But what goes on inside this church is not quite what you’d expect.

 

Here's the sound we played as a clue. We asked you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it. 

 

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with Sherri Young, Executive Director  of the African-American Shakespeare Company about the production of ‘Cinderella’ by AASC, opening on December 22nd at The Herbst Theatre in San Francisco. Joining them is Samantha Rose Williams, who plays the lead role. 

San Francisco Girls Chorus

Looking for a holiday event like no other? Then you might consider this year’s concert by the San Francisco Girls Chorus, called “A Highlands Holiday.” Choristers will present seasonal works and sing-alongs, and they’ll be joined by local bagpipers! 

Sweet Can Productions

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with conductor Randall Craig Fleischer, who leads the live performances of ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’, with live actors, an animated backdrop, and Vince Guaraldi’s music, performed by the San Francisco Symphony and the Symphony Chorus, starting December 21.

Sights & Sounds: Alisa Rose of Village Road Trio

Dec 15, 2016
Emma Brown / cropped and resized

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene. Alisa Rose, fiddler for the folk-inspired classical music group Village Road Trio told KALW’s Jen Chien about three fantastic arts events happening around the Bay this weekend.

Photo by Tom Levy

San Francisco's Japantown is a historic relic of an earlier time when Japanese immigrants and their families clustered here and found homes. In 1899, they founded a Jodo Shinshu Buddhist congregation, the first of that tradition on the continent.

Update: President Donald J. Trump signed an executive action on Jan. 25, 2017 to withhold federal grants from "sanctuary cities." 

When Donald Trump is inaugurated as President of the United States on Jan. 20, part of his 100-day action plan is to block federal funding to sanctuary cities. San Francisco received approximately $1 billion in federal funds last year. Berkeley, Oakland, and San Jose also stand to lose funding.

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Dickens Christmas Fair

Dec 8, 2016
Ninna Gaensler-Debs

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Angela Johnston

 

Austin Newsom is an Amtrak ticket agent at the Transbay Terminal in downtown San Francisco. On his lunch breaks, he takes walks along the Embarcadero.

“It’s really nice, and people usually, when they’re walking along the waterfront, for whatever reason they have big smiles on their faces. I think it makes people happy.”

 

Colin Kaepernick has been using his platform in the NFL to call attention to racial inequities. But the NFL itself has not always been equitable for people of all races.

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