San Francisco

 

In the garage of a house in San Francisco’s Excelsior district, rehearsal is underway. In the space where a car would normally go is a stage set: a table and chairs, a desk, a beat-up blue couch, and an old-fashioned pay phone hanging from a wall. 

Lisa Carmack

Tuesday night was the 31st year of National Night Out, an event that aims to help prevent crime by encouraging people get to know their neighbors and strengthen their communities. We sent reporters out to National Night Out gatherings all over the Bay Area to see what was going on.

Rhian Miller

I’m sitting at a table with Walter Kresnik and Quintin Rodriguez. They’re bent over big sheets of paper with pencils and markers and paint, drawing hearts.

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Writer Anisse Gross shared her pick - The Abortion - by Richard Brautigan, with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

  

 

 

On the July 24th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll talk about a recent report that found that 76 percent of public grant money in San Francisco goes towards arts programs with primarily white audiences, even as people of color make up over half of the city's population. What’s the right way to decide who gets public money for the arts? Do the criteria need to change to ensure that the broadest public is served? It's Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.

Guests: 

Eighteen-year-old Tatyana Martinez turned to writing poetry as a young girl to cope with big changes in her life. Over time, her poetry evolved into music. She now works for the youth run recording studio Upstar Records, inside San Francisco’s Sunset Youth Services. The youth center supports young people and their families with things like parenting classes, food assistance, and job training at Upstar. When she’s not helping young musicians make music, Martinez writes and records her own songs with the goal of putting out her own album. She shares the story behind her songs in this installment of Bay Area Beats.

Daniel Nicoletta

Gay Pride events take place in June in many communities around this country, and increasingly in other countries as well. The one here in San Francisco was among the first ever organized.

Blues legend Sugar Pie DeSanto still hits the high notes

Jul 10, 2014

She began winning talent shows up and down Fillmore Street at 18, when she weighed just 85 pounds, wore size 3 shoes and went by her given name, Umpeylia Marsema Balinton. 

This classic Al Green song reminds Mayor Ed Lee, of San Francisco, that if people face challenges together, they'll have a better chance of finding solutions.

Who’s using San Francisco WiFi?

Jun 17, 2014
http://www6.sfgov.org/index.aspx?page=246

At the corner of Sanchez and Market, Jason Dorn pulls out an iPhone. He’s at one end point of the access area for San Francisco Free WiFi, a free wireless network that the city launched this past December. It spans Market Street, from Castro Street to the Embarcadero.

 

For 23 years, retired California Highway Patrol Sergeant Kevin Briggs patrolled the Golden Gate Bridge for suicide jumpers. He talked hundreds of people off the ledge and back onto the bridge and earned the nickname, “The Guardian of the Golden Gate.” His powers of persuasion were the doorway between life and death. Sometimes, unfortunately, they just weren’t enough.

CCSF

City College of San Francisco is now able to stay open for another two years while it meets accreditation standards, according to the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges.

This is a relief for the college which has feared closure since last July, when the commission decided to terminate the college’s accreditation this coming July.

flickr user freeside510

San Francisco is booming as construction cranes transform the city skyline. One of the most significant changes is happening at the Hunters Point Shipyard. It's a project so big, it seems like a whole new town is being built within the city. Residences, shops, parks, and high-rises are being built and will replace the naval shipyard – once a major source of employment, but dormant for years. 

Julie Blaumstein

As the city of San Francisco experiences new waves of growth and expansion, we travel back to another time before redevelopment reshaped the Fillmore District. 

In the 40’s and 50’s the Fillmore was a vibrant mix of cultures, and a national hotspot for jazz musicians. On any given night you could hear the voice of Billie Holiday, or the playing of Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and Dizzy Gillespie. The lively and diverse neighborhood quickly earned a nickname: The Harlem of the West.   

San Francisco's Hunters Point Shipyard has played many roles. In the 1940s, it became a magnet for African Americans migrating from the South seeking jobs in the Navy's shipbuilding and maintenance industry. In the 1970s, when the military started to leave, it became an empty shell – a massive, polluted space eventually designated a Superfund site. Now, it's being redeveloped with the promise of new housing, jobs and open space. But in today's San Francisco, who is it for?

Behavioral health courts can give offenders who are mentally ill the option to be tried for non-felony crimes. Within the program, offenders can have access to not only the district attorney and public defender, but to several social services programs in order to help them get them back on their feet. 

One catch — they have to want to be in the program. 

San Francisco  spends about $165 million each year on homeless services, according to a report requested by city Supervisor Mark Farrell. In an attempt to understand the cost effectiveness of those programs, Supervisor Farrell organized a series of eight hearings this spring, focused on homeless services in San Francisco. Farrell sat down with KALW's Ben Trefny to talk about what came out of those hearings.


Don Meehan

You recognize this music – it’s our national anthem, performed by The Golden Gate Park Band, San Francisco’s municipal band. They stage free concerts throughout most of the year at the Spreckles Temple of Music in – where else? – Golden Gate Park.

The Golden Gate Park Band’s next performance is Sunday, May 25th, starting at 1:00pm.

Today’s local music is being played by the Jimmy Grant Ensemble. Grant, a native of northern California, grew up in a family of musicians. And that’s where he learned the music of jazz pioneer Django Reinhart.

The Jimmy Grant Ensemble will be playing Reinhart-style jazz guitar on Friday, May 23rd at The Red Poppy Art House in San Francisco. Expect them to start about 7:30pm.

Photo by Jeremy Dalmas

It can be hard to donate your old things to a thrift store, but the idea is that your stuff will get a second life. Once it is donated, it will make its way to new owners. But what does it take to get those things ready to be used again?

At 26th and Valencia in San Francisco is a nondescript three-story warehouse that used to be an old shoe factory. Now it is where the endless Salvation Army donations are sorted, and it is like a little city inside.

The Unloading Dock

Sunset Youth Services is an organization that supports transitional age youth and their families with things like parenting classes, food assistance, and job training. And it's home to the youth-run recording studio, Upstar Records, where young people learn audio production skills. That's where you’ll usually find 16-year-old Adriel Diaz. 

David Boyer

I was looking for a place just ahead of the tide of development in San Francisco. I found it at Third Street and Jerrold Avenue in the Bayview District. It's an intersection with one foot in the past and one in the future. On one side there’s a combination KFC/Taco Bell and an old Baptist church. On the other, there’s the new All Good Pizza and a non-profit co-founded by Steve Jobs’ widow, Laurene Powell Jobs. In The Intersection, I go corner by corner—and hear about life in the middle of a transition.

 

San Francisco is home to more than 5 thousand people of Arab descent. And despite living in what is perceived as one of the most culturally competent, tolerant areas in the country, since 9-11, Arab students have been complaining of abuse, taunting, and discrimination.

The Arab Cultural and Community Center of San Francisco has developed a toolkit and curriculum to help teachers better understand their Arab students’ backgrounds, and, give them the tools to address difficult issues they deal with.

Pete Villaseñor moved to San Francisco from his home state of Texas almost 20 years ago. That’s well before the Bay’s current housing troubles began. But, moving to a new place can come with other difficulties, like homesickness. Villaseñor told our community storytelling project Hear Here how he found solace in a new city.

Bay Area Beats: Meet San Francisco's Mystic Blaze

Apr 30, 2014

TraVaughn Hicks has been making music since he was a young boy and his rapper uncle would record him singing on his songs.

Radio Poets: Ruth Velasquez

Apr 30, 2014

Ruth Velasquez is a student at San Francisco's Cleveland Elementary School, where she writes poetry and plays soccer as part of the AmericaSCORES program.  KALW is proud to bring her voice to the air during National Poetry Month.

“Who am I?” 

Cleveland Elementary School

By Ruth Velasquez 

 

 

I am a girl that’s special to one and the others.

I am a girl who says

OK

I will try again

I am a human who says

Just stop

I am a human who says

Please don't hurt me

With rental housing being such a contentious topic in San Francisco, we thought it could be helpful to talk with the person who might know more about rent laws than anybody else in the city, the Executive Director of the San Francisco Rent Board.

Radio Poets: Marlon Barreno

Apr 29, 2014

Marlon Barreno  is a student at San Francisco's Junipero Serra Elementary School, where he writes poetry and plays soccer as part of the AmericaSCORES program.  KALW is proud to bring his voice to the air during National Poetry Month.

“Missing My Dad”

Marlon Barreno

J. Sierra Elementary School

 

I remember the dad that I had—

I remember going over his house

And sleeping with him limb to limb

I remember playing soccer with him

Trying a lot, giving him everything I got.

Natasha Mahia, a student at El Dorado elementary school in Visitacion Valley, is one of ROCK’s biggest fans. ROCK stands for Real Options for City Kids, an after-school and mentoring program for youth in Visitacion Valley.

Pages