San Quentin

San Quentin Prison Report: Back to prison

Jun 23, 2015
Nigel Poor

 

Local prison San Quentin combats recidivism with programs to help people adapt back into society. One of those projects is San Quentin Prison Report, a program training those who are incarcerated to produce stories from the inside.

After spending 25 years in prison for a first degree murder, Jessy Reed was finally preparing to be released. He vowed to never return to prison and looked forward to starting over with a new life on the outside. Once Reed was free, life on the outside became a series of challenges, piling up like one after the other.

 

I let so many people down who who who were looking up to me and just and just and just um expecting more of me you know I let down and hurt and and and that was devastating. --Jessy Reed

When loyalty is misguided

Jun 3, 2015
Nigel Poor

Though being in a gang often means violence, it also offers a sense of belonging. Gang loyalty can end tragically when members end up betrayed by the very same people they sought to impress. This is the story of three men who misplaced their loyalty -- and in each case ended up with life sentences.

Click the audio player above to hear the entire story. 

Simron Gill

 

When it comes to locking up young people, the US leads the industrialized world. And though youth incarceration rates have been declining for the last two decades, adult prisons still contain many inmates who entered the system as juveniles with life sentences. These prisoners have grown up and lived their entire adult lives behind bars.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, May 26, 2015

May 26, 2015
Leah Millis / San Francisco Chronicle

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

A few arrests in Oakland protests over limit on nighttime marches // SF Gate

For a second consecutive night, protesters took to the streets of Oakland on Sunday to challenge Mayor Libby Schaaf’s policy of cracking down on unlawful nighttime marches in an effort to prevent protest-related violence and vandalism.

William Bennett

A note to our readers: this is part 3 of our series on reentry. The names of formerly incarcerated men and their families in this story have been changed to protect their identities.

It’s a long drive from Oakland to the Deuel Vocational Institution, a prison in Tracy, California. For Brianna Bennett, growing up, that meant she rarely saw her father, William. He had never picked her up from school or gone with her to a movie. In fact, they had never stepped outside of the prison gates together.

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