San Quentin Prison Report

San Quentin Prison Report: Back to prison

Jun 23, 2015
Nigel Poor

 

Local prison San Quentin combats recidivism with programs to help people adapt back into society. One of those projects is San Quentin Prison Report, a program training those who are incarcerated to produce stories from the inside.

After spending 25 years in prison for a first degree murder, Jessy Reed was finally preparing to be released. He vowed to never return to prison and looked forward to starting over with a new life on the outside. Once Reed was free, life on the outside became a series of challenges, piling up like one after the other.

 

I let so many people down who who who were looking up to me and just and just and just um expecting more of me you know I let down and hurt and and and that was devastating. --Jessy Reed

When loyalty is misguided

Jun 3, 2015
Nigel Poor

Though being in a gang often means violence, it also offers a sense of belonging. Gang loyalty can end tragically when members end up betrayed by the very same people they sought to impress. This is the story of three men who misplaced their loyalty -- and in each case ended up with life sentences.

Click the audio player above to hear the entire story. 

Under CC license from Flickr user Carla de Souza Campos

 Jonathan Chiu is an inmate at San Quentin State Prison. He was born in Hong Kong in 1982 and moved to the United States with is family when he was eight years old. Soon after that, Chiu discovered his love of comedy. Writing jokes helped him cope with adapting to life in a new country. And comedy continues to help him adjust to life at San Quentin, where he regularly does stand up.

Lady Jay: Transgendered in prison

May 12, 2015

There are often situations in life when you might want or need a how-to manual, but none exists. One harsh example would be adjusting to life in prison. Imagine trying to do it as a transgender person. 

Expanding minds behind bars

May 4, 2015
Prison University Project Graduates of 2013
Nigel Poor

The Prison University Project is the only on-site degree college program in California's entire prison system. It's housed at San Quentin and the tuition-free program is so popular that prisoners across the state try to transfer to San Quentin to participate. San Quentin Prison Report's Tommy Shakur Ross tells the story of what happens when inmates go back to school.

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