science

12:30am

Thu October 23, 2014
Out in the Bay ~ 10/23/14 ~ 7pm Thursday

Sea Slugs & "Science, Neat"

Shayle Matsuda

  

Shayle Matsuda is a graduate student studying sea slugs at the California Academy of Sciences. Out of the lab, he creates research experiences for high school students and hosts an interactive happy hour series at San Francisco's El Rio bar called "Science, Neat." He draws by hand, water-colors and uses digital media to make science more accessible. (His hand-drawn "Science, Neat" whale illustration is pictured here.) At a Bay Area Science Festival event Oct. 28, Shayle will talk about the challenges and rewards of being in transition from female to male while in the close quarters of a scientific expedition. He shares these and other highlights of his personal journey and his passion for science on tonight's Out in the Bay with host Eric Jansen.  7pm Thursday, Oct. 23, 91.7 FM + kalw.org

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6:59pm

Thu October 2, 2014
Technology

Frugal Science: How one lab is using toys to make chemistry accessible to the world

Masai tribe school children building foldscopes to ask questions about science education and sanitation.
Prakash Lab


I am in a lab tucked away in the basement of a Stanford University engineering building. Bioengineering professor Manu Prakash is showing me a tiny music box which plays the song “Happy Birthday.” 

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7:11pm

Wed September 17, 2014
Health, Science, Environment

The Fog Harvester

John Lovell checking his fog harvest
Leila Day

John Lovell is holding onto a rope, easing himself down a steep drop-off.

“I’ve already fallen off it once!” Lovell yells, looking down a steep canyon called Avalon in Daly City. It’s a gusty place, with planes constantly overhead. Lovell is here to check on his harvest.    

“People ask me what I do, and I say, ‘[I] harvest fog,’ they say, ‘Harvest frogs?’” Lovell laughs.

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5:21pm

Tue August 12, 2014
Technology

Black Girls Code trains young women of color for careers in tech

Black Girls Code intern Vanessa See with another intern, Bella, working on a trampoline.
Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. The answer came in April of 2011, when she launched a company called Black Girls Code to teach girls how to build their own websites, make computer games, and train them for careers in the tech industry. Kimberly Bryant and her daughter, Kai, who has been through the program, joined KALW’s Hana Baba in the studio.

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7:30pm

Wed April 30, 2014
Economy/Labor/Biz

Women in STEM: Interview with Stanford math education researcher Jo Boaler

Back in 1992, toy company Mattel nearly had to recall its “Teen Talk” Barbie. Women’s groups protested the doll’s use of the phrase “Math class is tough.” They called it out for indirectly perpetuating a harmful stereotype-- that boys and men are better at math than girls and women. Research -- especially over the last 10 years -- has shown there is no innate difference in math ability between males and females. And yet the stereotype persists. Women earn 43% of all college math degrees, yet their presence is scarce in the higher echelons of mathematics.

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