science

Philosophy Talk: Diseases of the Mind

Nov 17, 2017

How do mental disorders differ from diseases of the body? 


Photo courtesy of Suz Somersall/modified from original

From her childhood as a self-confessed gaming nerd to her career as an engineering-inspired artist (or is it art-inspired engineer?), Suz Somersall has made a life of her own design. 

Philosophy Talk: Could the laws of physics ever change?

Aug 11, 2017

The laws of physics determine how things in the cosmos change. But what would happen if the laws themselves changed?


  

In 2006, Al Gore’s award winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth started a national conversation about climate change. What’s been accomplished since then?

 

Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. 

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...

Courtesy of Shruti Niak

Dr. Naik is a post-doctoral fellow at The Rockefeller University, leader of The Women In Science At Rockefeller program and winner of L'Oreal USA's 2016 For Women In Science award.

Your Call: Standing up for science

Dec 15, 2016

    

How are scientists standing up to Trump’s anti-science policies? Science historian Naomi Oreskes joins us to discuss climate change and scientific research under Donald Trump.

Philosophy Talk: Science and Gender

Nov 25, 2016
"science school" by Nelley used under CC license

Is science inherently sexist, or is it just practiced that way?


Philosophy Talk: The Mystery of the Multiverse

Oct 23, 2016
"Multiverse" by Tony Ibarra used under CC license

Could our universe be just one among an infinite number of universes in the multiverse?


Photo courtesy of Margarita Quihuis

According to the leaders of the Peace Innovation Lab at Stanford, there may be a path to global peace.  

Prakash Lab

 

Last month, four Bay Area residents were named Macarthur Award winners. That means they’re now unofficialy known as "geniuses". Each will receive more than $600,000, and can do with it what they will. That’s usually for the public good. So we all win.

Mary Roach and the unpretty facts of biology

Sep 14, 2016
Creative Commons

 


Author Mary Roach is prolific. Since 2003, she’s written best-selling books about cadavers, sex, ghosts, the digestive tract, and space toilets. Her latest book is ‘Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.' It delves into the very specialized science of modern combat.

Why repeating experiments in psychology is not the norm, and why it should be.

Philosophy Talk: The Dark Side of Science

Aug 5, 2016
"Germ Warfare" by Jack_Babalon used under CC license

Is there some knowledge we'd be better off without?


Deputy Administrator of NASA
NASA/Bill Ingalls

She is ushering in the next mission to Mars.

Jo Boaler- Revolutionizing Math Education 

Lina Nilsson discusses why bringing more women into engineering may be a matter of showing them the good they can do.

How could science help us understand our own happiness?

There is a STEM teacher shortage in K-12 education--resulting in an education gap that may leave many students under-prepared for our increasingly tech focused economy.

Philosophy Talk asks about the Ancient Cosmos

Mar 15, 2016

How could the smartest, most observant people around believe for millennia that the sun and all the planets and stars all revolved around the Earth?


Is "average" so last century? 

Philosophy Talk examines the year that was 2015

Jan 1, 2016

What happened in 2015 that challenged our assumptions and made us think in new ways?


Heather Wreckage

Check out our suggestions of unique events happening around the Bay Area this weekend.

www.dirtycello.com

Here are a few suggestions of special events that you can attend happening around our fine Bay Area this weekend.

Lu Olkowski

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers... 


How can we separate genetic fact from genetic fiction?


What in the world is a Monad? Why does Leibniz care so much about the so-called Principle of Sufficient Reason? And how could he claim that this is the Best of all Possible Worlds? 

Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her graduating class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math-- known as STEM.

There’s a science to happiness. And one of the centers for its study is right here in the Bay Area.

The Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley studies human happiness, compassion and altruism. KALW's Hana Baba wanted to find out the formula, so she went to the center and sat down with its co-director Dacher Keltner, author of the book, Born To Be Good.

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