segregation

Does racism persist today because of the bigotry of individuals or hate groups or are racist policies actually embedded in American law? What role have  local, state and federal governments played in promoting segregation and protecting white privilege? Joseph Pace and guests explore the topic of Institutional Racism and how government policies have promoted segregated neighborhoods, schools and communities, and in turn, restricted equal access to education and employment opportunities. Join the conversation this Monday at 7 pm on City Visions. 

Guests:

Colin Kaepernick has been using his platform in the NFL to call attention to racial inequities. But the NFL itself has not always been equitable for people of all races.

August 3, 2015: On our next show, host David Onek will be one-on-one with the Superintendent of San Francisco Unified School District, Richard Carranza.

On the April 17, 2015 edition of 99% Invisible:

Cities are great. They have movement, activity and diversity. But go to any city and it’s pretty clear, a place can be diverse without really being integrated. This segregation isn’t accidental.

Wikipedia Commons

On the January 5th, 2015 edition of Your Call, we'll speak with Richard Rothstein, research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and fellow at UC Berkeley. He argues that government actions like racially explicit zoning, public housing segregation, and federal requirements for white-only suburbs systemically segregated African Americans and set the stage for the protests and racial tension following the Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Missouri. How was our racial landscape created? And what's the way forward? It's Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

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Life of the Law: “Bad Constitution”  Alabama has the longest constitution, not just in the country, but in the world, with 885 amendments and counting.  Hear why it got that way, and how it affects everything in the state from school desegregation to pig farms.