senior citizens

San Francisco seniors cross the digital divide

Aug 4, 2015
Jen Chien

Mary Bartholomew is a senior citizen. A couple years ago, she didn’t know much about computers, or how to use the internet. And one day she found herself in a bit of a pickle.


Courtesy of Grant Avenue Follies

From the 1940s until the 1960s, San Francisco’s Chinatown was home to a thriving Chinese American nightclub scene. The clubs had names like Forbidden City, the Chinese Skyroom, and the Shanghai Low. They had showgirls, ballroom duos, comedians, jazz singers, and magic acts -- all featuring Asian-American entertainers. These clubs had wide appeal: celebrities like Bing Crosby, Duke Ellington, and Lauren Bacall were all spotted over the years, along with tourists, businessmen and locals.

CAPS bridges the gap for Fremont seniors

Feb 10, 2015

The main prayer hall at Gurdwara Sahib Fremont, the Fremont Sikh temple, is a cavernous room. A beautiful marble center aisle leads to an altar, which contains the holy book, or Guru Granth Sahib. This is one of the biggest gurdwaras in the Bay Area -- every Sunday, around 3,000 people come to worship, eat, and find fellowship.

Under CC license from Flickr user Patrick

A majority of Americans say their biggest financial concern is that they won’t be able to save enough money to retire. This finding, by a recent Gallup poll, is likely one reason that the average age of retirement in America has increased from 60 to 62 years old since the 2008 recession. For many people, though, retiring in their 60s simply isn’t possible.

Under CC license from Flickr user Mark Adkin

What happens to people in their 60s who can't afford to leave the workforce, but they can't find a job? One place unemployed seniors might turn for help finding a job is the Senior Community Service Employment Program. It provides job training to low income, unemployed people by finding them temporary work at nonprofits around the country. Roxanne Murray is a director working with the program for the Family Service Agency of San Francisco. 

photo courtesy of

Miguel Garcia has tears in his eyes while he’s singing a an old Righteous Brothers tune. This song brings back memories. He’s wearing a red Manchester United jersey, navy blue track pants and bright green flip flops.  Sixty one year old Garcia is  used to having a microphone in front of him, so he begins belting out a medley of his favorite songs. He says that his past was at times, well, unhealthy.

Paul Kleyman

More than one in ten people living in the densely packed Tenderloin and mid-Market neighborhoods are age 65 or older, and that percentage is expected to grow significantly in the next decade.

Pernilla Persson


On a wide street full of work spaces, lined with cars and no trees in sight is the Dr. George W. Davis Senior Center. It’s the one building on the block where there’s constant activity. Laughter pours out of the cafeteria which for now has been turned into a dance floor. 

Visakha Som

There are over 40 million people over the age of 65 in the US today. According to the census bureau, that number is going to double by mid-century. While the senior citizen population grows, the country’s economic health is declining, which brings up questions: How will we care for the elderly? How will we ensure they are fed, clothed, and sheltered?

Audrey DIlling

Palo Alto is one of the country’s wealthiest cities. Yet, a recent study by the Council on Aging Silicon Valley found that more than 20 percent of residents over 60 years old live near or below the poverty line. This reality makes competition stiff for the limited affordable housing options available.

The older we get, the harder it is to think of ourselves as “old.” But as far as the government is concerned – specifically, the federal corrections system – you’re “aging” or “elderly” once you turn 50. California houses one of the country’s biggest populations of elderly prisoners. And gradually, it also releases them.