Seniors

Courtesy of Grant Avenue Follies

From the 1940s until the 1960s, San Francisco’s Chinatown was home to a thriving Chinese American nightclub scene. The clubs had names like Forbidden City, the Chinese Skyroom, and the Shanghai Low. They had showgirls, ballroom duos, comedians, jazz singers, and magic acts -- all featuring Asian-American entertainers. These clubs had wide appeal: celebrities like Bing Crosby, Duke Ellington, and Lauren Bacall were all spotted over the years, along with tourists, businessmen and locals.

The Educating Seniors Project of the Trusts & Estates Section of the State Bar.
Guest: Jennifer Wilkerson, a Certified Specialist in Estate Planning, Trust & Probate Law.
Listeners with questions for Chuck Finney &/or Jennifer Wilkerson, please call 415-841-4134.
Our special once-a-month Call-A-Lawyer Night also is this evening. So, while Your Legal Rights broadcasts over 91.7 FM (online at kalw.org), 7 to 8pm, listeners can call the off-air attorneys, 800-525-9917, for private/no-fee consultation on any law questions they are prepared to discuss.

CAPS bridges the gap for Fremont seniors

Feb 10, 2015

The main prayer hall at Gurdwara Sahib Fremont, the Fremont Sikh temple, is a cavernous room. A beautiful marble center aisle leads to an altar, which contains the holy book, or Guru Granth Sahib. This is one of the biggest gurdwaras in the Bay Area -- every Sunday, around 3,000 people come to worship, eat, and find fellowship.

Tom Nolan on Gay Seniors

Feb 5, 2015

For almost two decades, Tom Nolan ran Project Open Hand, a meal service created during the AIDS crisis.  He's now chairman of the MUNI board. But his passion is gay rights, specifically the plight of the city's gay seniors.   What kinds of challenges do they face that others don't? You might be surprised. Marilyn Pittman talks with Tom about the findings of the LGBT Aging Policy Task Force. Thursday, February 5, 2015, at 7pm on kalw.org and 91.7fm. 

Jen Chien

California leads the nation in its population of senior citizens. The ratio of working-age adults to those over 65 is projected to plunge in the next few decades. Meanwhile, the need for financial and social support for this growing number of older adults presents new challenges for our society and our economy. One of the most pressing issues facing seniors is isolation.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, January 22, 2015

Jan 22, 2015
A private collector and www.outsidelands.org

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Jen Chien

Many older Americans today want to age in place. According to a recent AARP survey, 90% of seniors say they want to stay in their homes as long as possible. Aging in place has been shown to have great financial, emotional, and health benefits for seniors, but it can be difficult to actually pull off, as more support may be needed as time goes on. It can also be taxing on family members who may eventually become responsible for managing their care at home.

Under CC license from Flickr user Mark Adkin

What happens to people in their 60s who can't afford to leave the workforce, but they can't find a job? One place unemployed seniors might turn for help finding a job is the Senior Community Service Employment Program. It provides job training to low income, unemployed people by finding them temporary work at nonprofits around the country. Roxanne Murray is a director working with the program for the Family Service Agency of San Francisco. 

Isabel Angell

Part of getting older means you can’t get around like you used to. Maybe you can’t drive a car anymore, or hike up those big San Francisco hills to catch the bus.

Paul Kleyman

More than one in ten people living in the densely packed Tenderloin and mid-Market neighborhoods are age 65 or older, and that percentage is expected to grow significantly in the next decade.

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