sexual assault

Public domain photo

  

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll speak with a sports journalist and athletes about how the #metoo movement has rocked the sports world.

Gymnasts, swimmers, basketball players – athletes across the sports world – have come forward with revelations about sexual assault and abuse they have suffered over the course of their careers. What institutions and practices in the sports world protect perpetrators? And how can those power structures be dismantled?

Guests:

Anne Worner via Flickr used under CC BY-SA 2.0

  

On this edition of Your Call, investigative reporter Bernice Yeung discusses her new book, In A Day’s Work: The Fight to End Sexual Violence Against America's Most Vulnerable Workers.

 

Coalition of Immokalee Workers

  

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about farmworkers who are fasting in New York City to pressure Wendy's to join the Fair Food Program. Seventy farmworkers are fasting outside of the Manhattan hedge fund offices of Wendy's billionaire Board Chairman Nelson Peltz. They'll continue their fast until they march on Thursday to demand the chain join the Fair Food Program, which mandates better working conditions.

 

  

Women in low-wage jobs – janitors, domestic workers, farmworkers, waitresses – face rampant sexual abuse and assault on the job. When wages are low, there's no HR to report abuse and work sites can be isolated.

Photo by Chantal Cousineau

  

From judges and politicians to public radio hosts and actors, the power of the #metoo movement has brought down a wide range of powerful men for harassment and abuse.

Used Under CC via Pixabay

  

#Metoo continues to make international headlines. Actresses, actors, journalists, and politicians are sharing stories about sexual harassment and assault.

Photo courtesy of Maria Karas Photography/modified from original

With the Harvey Weinstein tsunami of sexual misconduct allegations, it has everyone asking, will this be the moment when everything changes? 

FAMILY WATCH DOG

A federal judge declared Colorado’s sex-offender registry unconstitutional earlier this month, ruling that making sex-offenders' addresses, ages and photos accessible to the public is cruel and unusual punishment. Now, an effort to reform California’s own sex-offender registry is raising questions and concerns.

 

On the October 14th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of gender, sexism, and abortion restrictions in the presidential election. 

Holly McDede

 

When Stanford student Brock Turner was sentenced to six months in prison for sexual assault, lots of people thought he deserved a longer sentence. They saw a white, college athlete let off the hook.

 

Photo by Austin Forbord Rapt Productions

 


On the September 29th edition of Your Call, Flyaway Productions’ choreographer Jo Kreiter joins us to discuss her latest piece, Grace and Delia are Gone.

Your Call: The politics of pleasure

Sep 20, 2016

 

On the September 20th edition of Your Call, journalist Peggy Orenstein joins us to discuss her book, Girls & Sex, Navigating the Complicated New Landscape.

Young men preventing sexual assault

May 5, 2016
Lisa Bartfai

 

When it comes to crimes like rape and sexual assault, the focus is shifting from prosecution and punishment to prevention. That means finding the cause of the problem and tackling it early on.

 

Lisa Norwood / flickr

  

On the August 26th edition of Your Call, we’re talking about  countering rape culture in a way that speaks to young men.

On the March 12th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Kirby Dick, director of The Hunting Ground, a new documentary about the epidemic of campus rape and sexual assault. One in five women in college are sexually assaulted. The federal government is currently investigating 100 colleges for mishandling or covering up rape cases. Who should be held accountable? And what actions should colleges take? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Sofi Karasek, co-founder of End Rape on Campus at UC Berkeley

 

When a rape is reported, the victim is medically examined, and the biological evidence acquired in that exam is called a "rape kit." That rape kit is used by prosecutors who try to bring the perpetrator to justice.

At least that's what is supposed to happen. But in many cases, it doesn't. Last month, a state audit found that half of all rape kits at the Oakland Police Department were never analyzed. Rape kit backlogs, it turns out, are plaguing the state. In Alameda County alone, the audit found close to 2,000 untested kits, dating back to 2001.

Assault and recovery, a reporter's personal tale

Nov 5, 2014

In 1992, KALW's Judy Silber was in Des Moines, Iowa for the Bar Mitzvah of a second cousin. On a late Saturday afternoon, she left the hotel where she was staying with her family and went out for a walk. While crossing over a bridge, a man grabbed her and pulled her down the grass embankment. A warning to listeners, this story involves some disturbing and graphic content.

Liz Mak

 

Sexual assault on college campuses is a topic that's difficult to escape right now. That's partly because earlier this year, the Department of Education released a list of 55 college campuses facing investigation for failing to take sexual assault reports seriously.

Wolfram Burner https://www.flickr.com/photos/wolframburner/10304330045 / Flickr Creative Commons



Your Legal Rights 4/24/13 Sexual Assault

Apr 24, 2013

Discussion on sexual assault and rape.