SF Public Press

Scientists project that the level of the water in the San Francisco Bay will rise three feet by the end of this century. That’s a conservative estimate - storm surges and extremely high tides could bring that number up to eight feet. This encroaching water poses a threat to existing developments and to future ones. In its latest investigation, the San Francisco Public Press examined the plans for more than 21 billion dollars worth of incoming development around the Bay.

SF Public Press

San Francisco's housing crisis has been making headlines for a while now. It’s hard to avoid the numerous news reports on skyrocketing rent prices, controversial evictions, or horror stories of terrible housing situations. But, there’s been far less coverage of what actual solutions there might be for these issues.

Photo by Tearsa Joy Hammock / San Francisco Public Press


Elementary school parent-teacher associations (PTAs) might conjure up images of bake sales and silent auctions. But how much money do you think a PTA can really raise?


This past Monday, Riverside County experienced a magnitude 4.7 earthquake. That’s not really news for Southern California, but this is: an earthquake detection system accurately predicted it.

Photo courtesy of http://newamericamedia.org/2012/02/human-trafficking-a-growing-global-scourge.php

Slavery doesn’t often make the headlines, but the practice is alive and well in the 21st century. According to an investigation in the San Francisco Public Press, there are more people enslaved today than at any other time in history. The U.S. State Department says that estimates of those enslaved through human trafficking ranges from 4 million to 27 million people.

Photo by Katie Styer

Michael Stoll is the executive director of the San Francisco Public Press – a non-profit, non-commercial journalistic outlet that started in 2009. Stoll reported for years in the mainstream media, including the Christian Science Monitor and the New York Times. But he questioned the values of ad-driven papers. He wants in-depth, public service journalism to be available without any commercial influence. The San Francisco Public Press carries no advertising – it’s actually modeled after public radio – and Stoll is about to publish his sixth print edition.