SFMTA

Daily news roundup for Thursday, June 30, 2016

22 hours ago
"San Francisco China Town” by Flickr user Loïc Lagarde, used under CC / Resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Crime: In rare occurrence, big three Bay Area cities see similar midyear homicide counts // San Jose Mercury News

"Halfway through the year, the homicide numbers of the Bay Area's three largest cities have reached a rare occurrence: They're nearly the same.

Daily News Roundup for Monday, April 18, 2016

Apr 18, 2016
"Sather Gate" by Flickr user Brian Fisher. Used under CC by-nc-nd 2.0 / Resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

Black Parents Say ‘Make UC an Option’ for African Americans // New America Media

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Mar 29, 2016
By Flickr user Marc / used under CC license / resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

State-managed retirement plan for California workers takes shape // Sacramento Bee

“By the end of the decade, millions of California workers could be enrolled automatically in a state-run retirement program viewed by proponents as the most significant attempt to address golden-years poverty since the New Deal.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, March 17, 2016

Mar 17, 2016
"casino", by Sergiu Biris, used under CC license, cropped.

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Supervisor Yee says SF must turn its attention to gambling addiction // SF Examiner

Super Bowl Impact: How will the big game affect your commute?

Jan 27, 2016
Courtesy of SFMTA / Resized and Cropped

Although the Super Bowl game is taking place in Santa Clara, the majority of pre-game celebrations will take place in busy downtown San Francisco and along the Embarcadero.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Sep 16, 2015
Youtube / SFGate

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

SFMTA says it needs $21 billion for next 20 years // SF Examiner

"Money makes transit go ’round. And in San Francisco, a new number has been identified to do just that: $21 billion.

 Years ago, private jitneys roamed up and down Mission Street collecting passengers, as an alternative to MUNI. Within the last few months, three new companies, Chariot, Leap and Loup, began offering shuttle services in San Francisco, though at least one recently suspended operations.  Are these new services siphoning riders, and therefore money, from MUNI?  Are they elitist, as many claim?  And how will they impact the bigger transportation picture in San Francisco?  Host Joseph Pace looks at the politics and impacts of these upscale jitneys.

Guests:

Daily news roundup for Thursday, May 7, 2015

May 7, 2015
Mike Koozmin/SF Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Taxi drivers catch a break from SFMTA // SF Examiner

"Fearing unfair competition from Uber and Lyft, The City just cut taxi drivers a break. The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency board of directors voted unanimously Tuesday to approve waiving taxi medallion renewal fees for this year, which are $1,000 annually.

Under CC license from Flickr user Phil Dokas

 

A new report from the Dutch mapping company TomTom ranks San Francisco the second most congested city in the country; only Los Angeles is worse. And in times of gridlock, people often choose to take public transit, bike, or even walk in order to avoid driving. It’s the job of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) to make those alternatives as appealing as possible.

Tom Nolan is chairman of the SFMTA. Nolan has served on transportation boards throughout the Bay Area, including SamTrans and Caltrain. Now, as Muni's chair, he’s presiding over the board at a time of rapid change. Tom Nolan sat down with KALW’s Raja Shah to talk about the current state of public transit in San Francisco and where it might be heading.

How safe is it to walk or cycle in San Francisco?  Last year, the city adopted Vision Zero, a policy designed to eliminate all traffic deaths and severe injuries by 2024.  Host Joseph Pace speaks with members of the coalition behind Vision Zero about what progress has been made toward that ambitious goal in the year since its adoption.   

Guests:

* Noah Budnick, Executive Director of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition

* Nicole Ferrara, Executive Director of Walk San Francisco

Liza Veale

Earlier this fall San Francisco Muni buses displayed an ad that may have upset you. Or angered you. Or made you feel threatened. The Muni ad was part of an anti-Islam campaign calling itself the American Freedom Defense Initiative, or AFDI. It wasn’t the first time AFDI’s ads ran on Muni buses and it probably won’t be the last.

Isabel Angell

The success of Bay Area Bike Share depends on one place: downtown San Francisco. Back in August, the program. made a well-calculated gamble and stuck half the bikes in an area covering downtown, the Financial District, and South of Market. Basically, if bike share doesn’t work there, it won’t work in the Bay Area.

Liz Pfeffer

http://sveneberlein.com/

 

Private shuttles have been using Muni stops in San Francisco for a while. But they’ve mostly been smaller buses, for hospitals and universities. In the past few years though, bigger charter buses for tech companies like Google and Genentech have also started to use Muni stops.

In total, the private shuttles regularly use more than 200 Muni stops around the city. San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) spokesperson Kristen Holland says the tech buses’ rising popularity has started to cause Muni delays.

Bike sharing is coming to San Francisco and Silicon Valley this August. It’s being launched on a small scale at first – just 750 bikes in the whole system. So the big question is: where should the bikes go?

The bids are in to build San Francisco’s Central Subway project – and the price tag will be over $100 million more than the city expected.

The Central Subway will be a 1.7-mile tunnel under the heart of the city for Muni’s T-Third light rail line. The subway will finally provide a connection from the up-and-coming South of Market neighborhood to densely populated Chinatown.

When he came into office last year, San Francisco mayor Ed Lee said fixing Muni wasn’t a priority for him. But in his 2013 State of the City address, Mayor Lee devoted almost ten minutes of his speech to the often-reviled public transit system.

Last week, we aired a story produced by KALW’s Ben Trefny and Rai Sue Sussman that discussed Golden Gate Park’s new biking lanes, and it prompted an unprecedented response. Here are some thoughts from our listeners:

Hailing a taxi in San Francisco can be nearly impossible if you’re not downtown. Calling ahead isn’t a guarantee either – often, the cab is late and sometimes it never comes.

(SF Bay Guardian) // Creative, artistically minded people are leaving San Francisco in search of affordable housing in the East Bay. Oakland is fast becoming the new hip location for the working class and young artists driven out of San Francisco by sky-rocketing rents. Oakland City Council member Rebecca Kaplan says those moving into Oakland and surrounding East Bay cities are of many different ethnicities including Ethiopian, Eritrean, and Vietnamese...

Photo by Flickr user Salim Virji

For some people, the daily commute will get a little easier this week. Monday morning, a new ferry service between the Oakland, Alameda, and South San Francisco opened. In San Francisco, regular service resumed on the MUNI’s N Judah and J Church lines, after ten days of repair work at some of the city’s busiest transit junctions. Statewide, however, things aren’t so bright. A new poll shows that voters are losing faith in plans for a high-speed rail system in California.