sharing economy

The way we make a living is changing. For about a third of Americans, regular hours and benefits are giving way to a patchwork of contracting, temping, and moonlighting.

David Zlutnick

Activists gathered in San Francisco’s North Beach neighborhood, last month, to call attention to part of the city’s housing crisis. They got together around a three-unit apartment building where flats are rented out to vacationers through an online broker. The protesters plastered the building with green stickers that said the tourist rentals there are illegal.

On the August 4th edition of  Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the transformation of the sharable economy with the explosion of for-profit companies like Airbnb, Lyft, and Task Rabbit? Big investors and venture capitalists are backing these companies. Who’s investing? What is the original mission of the sharing economy and how has it changed? What should a sharing economy look like? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.



Ben Trefny

The sharing economy in San Francisco is humming. Companies like Airbnb have figured out how to make a lot of money by using existing housing stock to meet consumer demand, which in Airbnb’s case is coming from tourists. Fast Company magazine declared AirBnB will soon become “the world’s largest hotel chain – without owning a single hotel.”

A Kickstarter for your electricity bill

Sep 25, 2013
Andreas Karelas

Youth Radio: Teens use Twitter to thumb rides

Aug 15, 2013

Listen to this story here.

Back in the 1970s, my mom turned 18 and got her dream car.

Jen Chien

In a small room, inside a former sewing machine factory in the mid-Market district of San Francisco, Mitsuru Muraki is jamming on some unconventional percussion instruments: two round glass vases and a couple of pencils. He and another musician named Gabe Stern are writing a song together. As Muraki moves on to drumming on a metal bucket, a tall, dreadlocked young man pokes his head in the door.

Photo courtesy of Flickr user OuiShare

People sharing their stuff with others is nothing new. Human beings have been exchanging and bartering since the dawn of history. But In recent years, the Internet has helped the so-called “sharing economy” reach new heights.

The Sharing Economy: Lunch with a side of karma

Jun 25, 2013

Snappy’s Cafe in Hayward is usually a good place to grab a quick cup of coffee, or maybe a pastry before heading to work. Either could run you anywhere from a $1.50 to $3. But on the third Sunday of every month, Snappy’s transforms.

The Sharing Economy: A bank where time is money

Jun 25, 2013
Under CC license from Flickr user tlindenbaum

Frieda Kipar Bay is an herbalist. She teaches workshops on growing herbs for medicine. A class like this might normally cost $50-$60, but at a recent workshop at the Homestead Skillshare Festival, at Hayes Valley Farm in San Francisco, students didn’t pay a dime.

Building a more resilient economy with Bay Bucks

May 16, 2013
Bunches and Bits


Sergio Lub is walking me through the stockroom of his jewelry company’s headquarters in Martinez. All around the room, precious metal bracelets and rings nestle in cardboard boxes with labels like “Mardi Gras” and “Sage Bundle.”


Lub’s been making and designing jewelry for over 30 years, but I’m not here to talk with him about that. I’m here to learn about something else he’s been experimenting with for just as long – alternative economies, or as he puts it: “trying to find different forms of this human invention we call money.”