ships

7:51am

Fri February 27, 2015
Arts & Culture

99% Invisible: Razzle Dazzle

On the February 27, 2015 episode of 99% Invisible:

Disruptive camouflage?  Think about zebras: it’s hypothesized that their stripes make it difficult for a predator to distinguish one from another when the zebras are in a large herd. The stripes also might make zebras less attractive to blood sucking horseflies. This is called disruptive camouflage.

When it comes to humans, the greatest, most jaw-droppingly spectacular application of disruptive camouflage was called Dazzle.

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7:13pm

Mon January 27, 2014
Arts & Culture

Richmond's real life Rosies

The Betty Reid Soskin Pages

During World War II, the city of Richmond quadrupled in size when about 70,000 workers flocked to work at the shipyards that dotted the bay’s shoreline. At the height of the war, women made up more than a quarter of the Richmond shipyard workforce. For the first time, women were allowed to work in high-paying trades, previously only done by men. 

Betty Reid Soskin was four years old when she moved to the East Bay – she grew up there in a Creole and Cajun community from New Orleans. Soskin says the Bay Area quickly became a hub of wartime shipbuilding. 

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8:35pm

Wed March 6, 2013
Health, Science, Environment

Remembering the Bay's Naval history before it floats away

Naval Defense Reserve Fleet in Suisun Bay
Ashleyanne Krigbaum

After World War Two, Suisun Bay was a west coast port for the navy’s largest ships. The first grey goliaths arrived in the bay in 1946, and continued coming in over the following decades. They were meant to be a reserve fleet – so in theory, if the Navy ever needed extra ships, this is where they would get them. But for the most part, they never have needed them. And over time, the fleet has become a graveyard – a graveyard that needs a lot of upkeep.

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