Silicon Valley

According to a 2013 study, one in six people who work in Silicon Valley spend at least two hours on their commute. Nuemi Guzman is one of those people. She’s a legal assistant with the Law Foundation of Silicon Valley.

 

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Jul 21, 2015
Ted Friedman

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Oakland still wading in trash; council delays action // Oakland Tribune

"The City Council on Monday delayed making changes to Oakland's unpopular trash contract after weeks of complaints from residents and business owners over higher garbage rates, saying it needed more information before taking action on the deal.

I spoke to Marianne Cooper, a sociologist at Stanford University's Clayman Institute for Gender Research and author of  the 2014 study: Cut Adrift: Families in Insecure TimesCooper spent two years shadowing 50 affluent, middle class and low-income families in Silicon Valley to understand how they are faring as big high-tech firms move in the neighborhood and reshape their lives.

Silicon Valley Gives: Today's the day!

Apr 17, 2015

KALW has been selected to participate in Silicon Valley Gives, a one-day donation campaign to mobilize support for local nonprofits through a single online platform. 

Gun crime drops in Oakland, according to new data // Contra Costa Times

"If it seemed like fewer nights were interrupted by the sounds of gunfire and sirens last year, that's not your imagination.

"Oakland, which in 2014 had its fewest homicides in 14 years, also saw a big reduction in one of the leading causes of murder: gunfire.

Isabel Angell

In early December 2014, the city of San Jose tore down the Jungle, a homeless encampment thought to be one of the biggest in the country. One of the people evicted from the Jungle was 27-year-old Tami Cockrell. I met her that day as she was pushing a shopping cart away from the Jungle, piled high with everything she owned. She was crying because she couldn’t find her boyfriend.

San Jose dismantles The Jungle

Dec 4, 2014
Isabel Angell

Crews dismantled a large homeless encampment in San Jose Thursday. Called the “Jungle,” it’s thought to be the biggest homeless camp in the country. The camp was home to up to three hundred people who occupied over sixty acres of a park along a creek bed. But San Jose has been under pressure from different agencies who say the Jungle is polluting the creek.

Early Thursday morning, Tamara Cockrell walked away from the Jungle, pushing a shopping cart piled high with all her belongings.

transmitdistort.deviantart.com

Feinstein: "rouge dispensaries" would benefit from new bill… Washington state lawsuit could have wide implications … The graying of Harborside… Big Tobacco watches and waits… Health news… Maureen Dowd’s bad trip… and more.

LEGALIZATION

Audrey Dilling

Sarahi Espinoza Salamanca and her team of designers and coders have the next 25 hours to build a website. Not just any website, but one that’s engaging enough to influence the national conversation around immigration policy.

Liz Pfeffer

On the July 7, 2013 edition of Work with Marty Nemko, I talk with Mike Cassidy, Pulitzer-Prize winning columnist for the Mercury News. He describes his column, Silicon Valley Dispatches, as an anthropologist's albeit sometimes lighthearted look at that unique culture. I'll ask him:


On today’s Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about political power in Silicon Valley. Who are the big tech companies -- and their executives -- giving money to?  Is there any sign that their political commitments have changed since 2008? Join us at 10am pst or leave a comment here. President Obama raises millions from Silicon Valley. What are the specific policies and legislation that matter to tech companies? And who’s calling the shots? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Photo courtesy of http://www.benetech.org/about/

The Silicon Valley company Benetech’s motto is “Technology serving humanity.” It’s a different type of tech venture. It measures its success not in dollars, but by service to society and the environment. The man who founded Benetech is Jim Fruchterman, a former rocket scientist turned pioneer in this field called “social technology.” He was named a Macarthur Fellow, a “genius,” for his work. Fruchterman came by spoke with KALW’s Hana Baba about why he chose social good over monetary profit.