The Spiritual Edge

Credit Front Group

The Spiritual Edge is a multimedia project from KALW Public Radio exploring the shifting, dynamic nature of the American religious landscape. We seek the hot spots where change is occurring, including among immigrant groups, Christian communities, at the intersection between spirituality, religion and health, and in a growing DIY spiritual culture.

Visit the project's website.

A woman takes on the Church by becoming a priest

Feb 9, 2015
Tom Levy

In the dining room of her San Francisco home, Maria Eitz shows off her priestly attire -- a beautiful red, embroidered stole.

It is the only accessory that distinguishes Eitz from the rest of her community. Usually, there is more separation, especially during mass when Catholic priests wear robes. Considering everything else, her wardrobe is a relatively minor deviation. The Vatican bans women from the altar. Yet Eitz is a woman who two years ago became a Catholic priest.

StoryCorps: Healing the mind by way of hospice

Feb 9, 2015

When someone is dying, sometimes the best medicine is not medicine at all. And sometimes what needs to be healed, is not the body, but the mind. That is the kind of caretaking that Paul Kelley takes pride in doing. When Kelley began his career as a hospice worker in 1983, he knew instantly that he had found his calling.

 

"I can't fix my toilet at home, I can't fix the car, I can't do bookkeeping, I can't do computers. But I can be with someone who is dying, for some reason."

Click the audio player above to listen to the story.

Hana Baba

While the majority of the world’s Christians celebrate Christmas on December 25th, a number of Orthodox sects follow an older-than-Gregorian calendar. They celebrate every year on January 7th. 

Living in a multi-cultural city yields all sorts of surprises. On a corner in Oakland just east of Lake Merritt, a small Buddha has helped bring neighbors together.

The Spiritual Edge: News roundup for 10.31.14

Oct 31, 2014

 

It’s Halloween! Trick or treating, and parties are the usual ways to celebrate, but a group of Wiccans in San Jose have a different idea, according to the San Jose Mercury News. They’re honoring Samhain, “a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the "darker half" of the year.”

 

The Spiritual Edge: News roundup for 10.16.14

Oct 17, 2014

The biggest news in religion this week was the Vatican’s dramatic shift on how it views gay people, unmarried couples who live together and those who have divorced. The Los Angeles Times reports that Vatican expert John Thavis called it no less than an “earthquake.” That IS A metaphor often used by news media, but it was a huge departure from the staunch conservatism that has dominated the Catholic church.

 

Native American sweats out trauma of the past

Sep 9, 2014
Tom Levy

It’s intense in a sweat lodge. You enter a round structure, about five feet high at the center, and sit down on the earthen floor. Then the flap of heavy blankets closes and you’re left in utter darkness. Moments later, the leader pours water over hot, volcanic rocks. Like a sauna, thick steam rises and spreads.

 


These days, a lot of people prefer the word “spirituality” over “religion”. Many people associate religion with dogma handed down by inflexible institutions that don’t keep up with the times. 

The Marsh- SF

 

Dezi Gallegos is a playwright who is searching for God. He's only 18 years old, but says he's already lived through numerous tough life experiences that led to him asking the question: is there a loving God? And if so, why are these bad things  plagues, he calls them  happening to me and my family? 

http://www.anamericanmosque.com/

The San Francisco Bay Area is home to 250,000 Muslims. They work in tech, medicine, commerce, the service industry. And if you drive two hours north of San Francisco, to Yuba City, you’d find a Muslim farming community that’s been there for nearly a century. Pakistani immigrants made their way to Yuba City in the 1920s and today grow almonds, oranges, alfalfa, and prunes. Lots of prunes. The community was living peacefully until one fateful day in 1994, when disaster struck. Oakland filmmaker David Washburn’s new film An American Mosque tells their story. I spoke to Washburn about making the film.

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