SPUR

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No strangers to natural disasters, San Francisco, Berkeley and Oakland have long been pioneering ways to rebound from earthquakes, floods, droughts and fires. But what does it mean to call ourselves “resilient,” and should we be doing more?  Host David Onek and guests take a look at the innovative ways the Bay Area is adapting not just to survive, but to prosper, in the wake of a natural disaster -- and how preparedness goes beyond a simple earthquake kit.

Guests:

Host Joseph Pace examines food insecurity in San Francisco and EatSF, a new fresh fruit and vegetable voucher program for "food insecure" residents of the Tenderloin.  

Nearly one quarter of San Francisco's residents don't have reliable access to fresh, nutritious food, despite the city's commitment to social services.  The Department of Public Health and UCSF  have teamed up to create EatSF to tackle this problem.  If EatSF works, it will expand to other neighborhoods.

 

We don’t build housing projects like we used to anymore. It used to be big, labyrinthine complexes like Marcy Houses in New York, Cabrini Green in Chicago, and Geneva Towers in San Francisco. Today, conversations about development have to do with mixed-use, mixed-income communities. Much of the change has to do with how cities now think about urbanism. And a lot has to do with how affordable housing gets funded.

  

  

What's the Future for Families in San Francisco?

Sep 24, 2013

  With rising home prices, astronomical rents and crowded neighborhoods, it's no surprise that many San Francisco families are struggling to stay in the City. But at the same time, renewed job growth and improving public schools make San Francisco a place where more parents want to raise their children. What is the future for families in San Francisco? How are housing, employment and other forces impacting families in the City, and what lies ahead? What can policy makers and government leaders do to help families stay in San Francisco?

How much more water can the Bay Area conserve?

Mar 28, 2013
www5.sfgov.org

Advocates say that by mid-century the Bay Area will not have enough water to meet its needs without increasing supply or curbing demand. What more can local agencies and consumers do to conserve water, and can conservation alone help us avoid extreme water scarcity? Is water too cheap? What will it take to convince us all to adopt more water-efficient practices?

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For the last twenty years, San Francisco city leaders have promised to address the long-standing challenges facing the Mid Market Street neighborhood, but nothing has really changed.Now, San Francisco is taking a fresh approach to revitalizing Mid Market Street that includes attracting tech businesses and actively reaching out to arts organizations, community groups and residents to create a new vision for  this diverse neighborhood.

Benjamin Grant is the Public Realm and Urban Design program manager at the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association – also known as SPUR. He says that means he works on “public space and the physical form of the city.” He also knows quite a bit about the history of parks in the Bay Area.