Stanford

https://www.flickr.com/photos/matt_hintsa/

Twice a week, the Heart of the City Farmers Market transforms San Francisco’s gritty United Nations Plaza with dozens of white canopies and truckloads of fresh produce. But on a recent sunny winter Wednesday, the abundance of sweet-smelling fruits and vegetables are contrasted by a gloomy point.

It didn’t rain once here last January. Not in this spot, nor in all of San Francisco.

transmitdistort

Cannabis goes to Congress… Nevada first state with 2016 ballot measure… “I speak for the salmon”…  Business news… Lawyer drops baggy in court room… and more.

LEGALIZATION

Jeremy Dalmas / KALW

Cris Miranda is a believer.

“Dude! I feel like I'm living inside of a novel,” says the Bay Area-based programmer. “This is the story of humanity for the 21st century. I think VR is going to be huge, and it's gonna define life on planet earth as we know it.”

Miranda believes in the promise of virtual reality. After decades of hype, 2015 may be the year that it breaks into homes around the country.

Under CC license from Flickr user Ken Lund.

 

Thuylynh Nguyen’s family came to the U.S. from Vietnam in order to escape political persecution. Her father had spent eight years as a prisoner of war after serving as a soldier in the South Vietnamese army. The U.S. granted her family asylum in 1991.

 

When you listen to the radio in your car, you’re listening -- but mostly driving. Your hands are on the wheel, eyes on the road, and you’re aware of the cars around you, your speed, and your environment.But, it’s really easy to take our eyes off the windshield, even just for a second.

The Science of Compassion

Jul 16, 2012

What makes us want to be good?

“Compassion is complex,” says Emiliana Simon Thomas, the former associate director of CCARE, the Center for Compassion And Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University.

Brian Knutson, associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Stanford University, adds: “It’s not quite an emotion, is it? It’s more sophisticated.”

Emerging science is exploring how our minds feel for others.

“Can we see it?” asks Knutson. “Does it help people to extend compassion? That would be very exciting.”

On June 18th, City Visions explored new research on and interventions for mental illness. Questions discussed included: how are health professionals in the Bay Area identifying and treating people with mental illness? What is the role of family members and family history in the treatment process? And how does the stigma of mental illness impact patients who seek diagnosis and treatment? Guests were:

Dr. Terence Ketter of the Bipolar Disorders Clinic at Stanford University

When scientists started studying genomes, and then sequencing them, their work was hailed as revolutionary. But, they were mostly done in connection with Caucasian genes and some African and East Asian populations. One of the races no one studied was the Persian race. That is, until last year. Stanford researchers received a $250,000 grant from a Persian American foundation called PARSA to study the Iranian genome. The idea is to learn more about the history and varied cultures of the Iranian people, and to explore the field of personalized medicine.

Last night, in San Francisco's Ingleside neighborhood, a woman and a boy were sent to the hospital due to a mysterious explosion allegedly caused by drug manufacturing. The situation is undergoing investigation; it has not been released what drug was being made or what the relationship of the two were. Police plan to arrest the 33-year-old woman…