Storycorps

4:27pm

Thu December 6, 2012
Arts & Culture

StoryCorps: Navigating a mother's mental illness

Carole Peccorini had to grow up quickly. When she was eight, her mother began to show symptoms of mental illness. As her disease progressed, her family struggled to hold itself together. In this story, Carole talks to her husband Francisco Peccorini and her daughter Chalon Bridges about how her mother’s case of Huntington’s Disease affected her childhood.

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9:26am

Tue November 27, 2012
Arts & Culture

StoryCorps: A most peculiar playground

Marianne Gillmer was born in Germany during World War II. Growing up in her village during those tragic years was tough on her family, especially after her father died in battle. She was aware of death at a young age, but she and her best friend still found ways to remain playful and adventurous. In this story, she tells her daughter Susan about one of her most peculiar playgrounds – the local cemetery.

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4:11pm

Mon October 15, 2012
Arts & Culture

StoryCorps: Determined to be president

Patricia Hemphill was very young when it dawned on her that she had a big dream for her future, but it wasn’t very well-received by her teacher at the time, Ms. Hart. Hemphill shares the story in this interview with her mother, Anniece Hemphill at the San Francisco StoryCorps booth in the Contemporary Jewish Museum.

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5:04pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Arts & Culture

StoryCorps: What about same-sex divorce?

Emily McGranachan spoke at the the StoryCorps booth in San Francisco
StoryCorps

When Emily McGranachan was a child, her mothers decided to end their long-term relationship. McGranachan sat down with San Francisco StoryCorps to explain what it is like for a child when two parents of the same-sex split up, and how having a legally married status comes with the additional privilege of the ability for a legal divorce.

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4:38pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Arts & Culture

StoryCorps: A mother defies her parents to begin a family of her own

Robyn Raber Luna with her daughter, Rachel Luna Hemmer

In 1967 the landmark Supreme Court case Loving vs. Virginia made the United States a better place for many people in love. The ruling declared the 1924 Racial Integrity Act, which prohibited marriage across racial boundaries, unconstitutional. If not for Loving vs. Virginia, Robyn Raber Luna would not have been able to marry her Filipino husband and then have their daughter, Rachel Luna Hemmer.

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