Daily news roundup for Wednesday, May 18, 2016

May 18, 2016
Flickr user Susie Plascencia. Used under CC BY. Cropped.

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News.

Oakland Green Lights Drug War Reparations, Passes Marijuana Equity Program // East Bay Express

“Oaklanders who’ve been jailed for pot in the last two years will go to the front of the line for legal weed permits under a revolutionary new program enacted by the City Council Tuesday night.

 On the February 10th edition of Your Call, David Talbot joins us to discuss his new book,"The Devil’s Chessboard: Allen Dulles, the CIA, and the Rise of America's Secret Government." 

Image by Flickr user Daniel Arauz, with Creative Commons license. This photo was resized and cropped.


EDITOR'S NOTE: A previous version of this article contained errors that have been corrected, below:

* We stated that Brian Hofer had been working for a decade to scale back Oakland's Domain Awareness Center (DAC). The public became aware of the DAC in 2013, and Hofer began his work on the DAC in January of 2014.

On a February morning, Taser International CEO Rick Smith paced in front of a crowd of hundreds of law enforcement officers from across California. Known for its electronic weapons, the ubiquitous stun guns used by law enforcement around the world, Taser is banking its future on recording and documenting what police do in the field.

Should we think of whistleblowers as selfless martyrs, as traitors, or as something else?  Hear John Perry and Ken Taylor's conversation with the world's most famous whistleblower, Edward Snowden.  Tuesday at 12pm.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 16, 2015

Apr 16, 2015
Paul Chinn / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Counter-Terrorism Officials Helped Track Black Lives Matter Protesters // East Bay Express 

Journalist Cyrus Farivar knows a thing or two about surveillance. While reporting for Ars Technica, Farivar got the entire license plate reader dataset from the Oakland Police Department -- that’s all of the license plate scans they recorded and saved -- from December 2010 to May 2014. He says Oakland has no official policy for how long they keep all of that information. And, he says, it’s not the only problematic surveillance technique being used in the city, or across the state. Farivar came into our studios to talk about his reporting with KALW’s Sandhya Dirks. 


Surveillance and privacy issues have been in the news a lot in the past few years. Perhaps the biggest news was made by by Edward Snowden, who leaked information about the NSA’s massive collection of American citizens' cell phone data. But the privacy debate has also hit closer to home. You may remember last spring, when the Oakland City Council debated a controversial surveillance hub called the Domain Awareness Center, or DAC.




On the November 19th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll speak with Shane Harris, author of @War: The Rise of the Military Internet Complex. He writes that protecting cyberspace has become the US government’s top national security priority. Waging war in cyberspace is becoming a private affair. So what does the “military-Internet complex” mean for our personal freedoms and future? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.






Life of the Law: Privacy Issues  Mike Katz-Lacabe is a normal, taxpaying, married, father of two. And yet, the San Leandro police department has what amounts to a family photo album of him and his car.  If you drive a car and live in an American city, your local police department probably has an album of you, too.

Today on Your Call: JFK assassination: 50 years later

Nov 22, 2013

Civil Liberties: Is Our Right of Privacy Gone? 

Guests:  Hanni Fakhoury, Staff Attorney, the Electronic Frontier Foundation; Ben Rosenfeld, an attorney who specializes in police misconduct cases, civil rights cases and criminal defense law; and Shahid Buttar, Executive Director of the Bill of Rights Defense Committee.

Listeners: please call-in with questions/comments for the guests: 415-841-4134.

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Jonathan Macintosh

Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler has been a New York Times correspondent in Israel and Moscow. In his two most recent books, released earlier this year, he turns his attention to the erosion of civil liberties in the United States. In Rights at Risk and The Rights of the People, Shipler argues that both the War on Terror and the War on Crime have allowed the government to seep into Americans' personal lives in unconstitutional ways. Shipler discussed his new books with KALW's Criminal Justice Editor, Rina Palta.