tech

Peiyu Liu / flickr

 Have longer hours and more responsibilities become the new norm in the American workplace? 

Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her graduating class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math-- known as STEM.

Bay Area hackathon brings tech to youth of color

Mar 23, 2015
Johnathan Henninger

When President Obama launched the My Brother’s Keeper initiative in 2014, he said he hoped it would help boys and young men of color find success. Here in the Bay Area, Qeyno Labs answered the President's call with an event called the My Brother’s Keeper Hackathon. It's an intensive weekend challenge for young people of color to build mobile applications and websites that help their communities. 

The Problem


The way we make a living is changing. For about a third of Americans, regular hours and benefits are giving way to a patchwork of contracting, temping, and moonlighting.

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California drought: Big storm on the way for Northern California // Contra Costa Times

"After the driest January in recorded history, the Bay Area is back in the rain business.

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Angela Johnston

Del Seymour makes sure to take everybody on his walking tours of the Tenderloin to the corner of Turk and Taylor.

“I lived on this street,” he says. “I didn’t have an address but I lived on this street if you know what I mean.”

I’m with a group of a dozen tech workers following Seymour around the neighborhood, listening to him talk about his experiences here.

Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. The answer came in April of 2011, when she launched a company called Black Girls Code to teach girls how to build their own websites, make computer games, and train them for careers in the tech industry. Kimberly Bryant and her daughter, Kai, who has been through the program, joined KALW’s Hana Baba in the studio.

Your Call: Is coding the new literacy?

Jul 30, 2014

  

 

 

On the July 30th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we're talking about what skills are necessary for success in the digital age. The Department of Labor predicts that there will be 1.2 million new computer-science related jobs by 2022, but fewer computer science majors are graduating today compared to the 1980's. Is coding the key to securing a good paying job? If so, how can we make it accessible to all? How are organizations reaching out to underserved communities? Join us on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

 

Paul Kleyman

More than one in ten people living in the densely packed Tenderloin and mid-Market neighborhoods are age 65 or older, and that percentage is expected to grow significantly in the next decade.

 

While some high-profile women--like Sheryl Sandberg at Facebook, or Marissa Meyer at Yahoo--have made it to the top of the tech world, few women are waiting to succeed them. In 2010, women earned JUST 18% of computer science degrees. And while women are the main users of online social networking and e-commerce, most leaders of these companies are men.

Audrey Dilling

Sarahi Espinoza Salamanca and her team of designers and coders have the next 25 hours to build a website. Not just any website, but one that’s engaging enough to influence the national conversation around immigration policy.

Eric Cabanis/AFP/Getty Images

About 18 months ago, novice entrepreneur Sue Khim flew to San Francisco from her home in Illinois to take part in an uncommonly public version of a Silicon Valley rite of passage — the pitch. With thousands of other young techies in the audience, she was scheduled to be onstage at the Launch Festival, a showcase for “stealth” startups that have managed to keep their products out of the voracious tech press, or have as-yet-unreleased products to announce.

Tim Anderson, Bay Area DIY superhero

Nov 19, 2012

There’s a sprawling industrial park on the waterfront in Alameda that once was a Navy air base. What had been the base's air traffic control tower was taken over by a gaggle of MIT engineers working on a variety of high-tech projects. One is an airborne wind turbine, being developed by a company called Makani Power. Tim Anderson refers to himself as Makani's pro bono night watchman. He feels strongly America needs to get off petroleum, and he has other ideas about other changes this country should make.