technology

When it comes to girls who code must it be "perfection or bust"?

Work with Marty Nemko: 6/12/16: The Inevitable

Jun 12, 2016

On the June 12, 2016 edition of Work with Marty Nemko, I talk with Kevin Kelly, author of The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 technological forces that will shape our future.

By Tony Webster/ under CC license/ cropped and resized

 

When I started asking people about their dream transit system for the Bay Area, a lot of people said they want transit to be more convenient. My friend Chris Quines – everyone calls him Burd – plays in punk bands.

 

Nancy Lublin, Founder of Crisis Text Line 

On the March 8th edition of Your Call, we’ll revisit our conversation about the benefits of nature on our mental health.

Berkeley scientist designs tools for the visually impaired

Mar 2, 2016
Berenice Freedome

 

Dr. Joshua Miele's morning commute to Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute takes about an hour—as long as no one gets in the way. In fact, most people move out of his way when they see him coming, because Miele is blind.

Daily News Roundup for Monday, February 22, 2016

Feb 22, 2016

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

Troubled SF transit project puts public on hook to Goldman Sachs // SF Chronicle

The over-budget Transbay Transit Center is so stretched for cash that officials have been forced to take out a short-term loan from Goldman Sachs that puts the public on the hook for $37 million just in fees and other charges.

Cris Miranda is a believer. “Dude! I feel like I'm living inside of a novel,” says the Bay Area-based podcaster.

Your Call: The healing power of nature

Jan 10, 2016

On the January 11th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the benefits of nature on our mental health.

Calling your mother can sometimes feel like you're in a spy film.

Interview: Steven Hill

Dec 1, 2015
Courtesy of Steven Hill

The Sharing Economy is a term we’ve heard a lot in the past couple of years, with companies like Uber, AirBnb, and Taskrabbit on the rise.

 

 

If there’s a smartphone in your pocket, or your pocketbook, you’re probably familiar with emojis. They’re the little icons that brighten up dry digital messages with smiley faces and hearts, skulls and rockets. These little picture symbols are meant to convey an idea, a feeling, or an object—and they seem to work. For the first time ever, the Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year for 2015 was not a word, but an emoji. 

Get off your cell phone, dad!

Nov 24, 2015

Did you get a text? A new email? Maybe you’re emoji-ing your friends right now just for fun. Ninety percent of adults have a cell phone and almost 65 percent have smartphones. Nearly three quarters of teens have a smartphone or have access to one. Almost a quarter of them say they are online "almost constantly." Some teens, though, feel like they get in trouble for using their phones while parents get off scot-free. 

On the November 3rd edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with cultural critic Hal Niedzviecki about his new book, Trees On Mars: Our Obsession with the Future.

CODE: Debugging The Gender Gap

 


Tech jobs are growing faster than colleges can award computer science degrees. A Microsoft report states that in less than ten years, there will be one million available computing jobs in the U.S. How many of those jobs will be filled by women? As of now, not many. 

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Oct 13, 2015
Getty Images

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 

Twitter lays off 336 employees, 8 percent of workforce // NBC Bay Area

“Twitter is laying off 336 employees, signaling CEO Jack Dorsey's resolve to slash costs while the company struggles to make money. The cutbacks announced Tuesday equate to about 8 percent of Twitter's workforce of 4,100 people.”

Under CC license from Vahid. http://www.flickr.com/photos/el_chupacabrito/2474728043/

Stand on the beach overlooking Half Moon Bay, and the sound you’re most likely to hear is of waves crashing against the rocks. But when Roger Bland climbed up there, he wanted to hear what was underneath those waves.

San Francisco seniors cross the digital divide

Aug 4, 2015
Jen Chien

Mary Bartholomew is a senior citizen. A couple years ago, she didn’t know much about computers, or how to use the internet. And one day she found herself in a bit of a pickle.

 

 

Scientist and entrepreneur Richard Caro believes tech innovation has the power to actually change the way we grow older, "to really push off the time at which things like how well you can walk and how well you can talk starts to decline."

Caro is the CEO of Tech Enhanced Life, a public benefit corporation that researches and evaluates technology for seniors. KALW’s Jen Chien spoke with him about some new developments in home safety for aging adults.

 

Surveillance and privacy issues have been in the news a lot in the past few years. Perhaps the biggest news was made by by Edward Snowden, who leaked information about the NSA’s massive collection of American citizens' cell phone data. But the privacy debate has also hit closer to home. You may remember last spring, when the Oakland City Council debated a controversial surveillance hub called the Domain Awareness Center, or DAC.

Liz Pfeffer

These days, our technology is getting smarter. We don’t just talk on the phone anymore, we talk to them. Siri is already a household name and our homes are getting smarter, too. There are thermostats that you can control from your cell phone. And smoke detectors that will text you if there’s a fire. San Franciscan Tom Coates has taken this technology one step further. He’s designed his home to track its vitals and tweet them out to the world, all triggered by a network of wi-fi enabled sensors.

Whether it's making donations and signing petitions online, or using social media to highlight political causes, cyber-activism has never been easier. With a few clicks, we can make our voices heard around the globe. But who's listening, and is anything actually changing? Does cyber-activism mobilize real-world action on the ground, or does it reduce political engagement to simple mouse-clicking and ultimately threaten the subversive nature of change?

Julie Martin/NEDCC

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...

    

Jack Alley for The New York Times

Sharing economy companies like Uber and Lyft have become a powerful part of the economy. Now, some of the workers propelling that sector are organizing to ask for more from the companies that pay them. Drivers from both companies have filed a lawsuit -- they want to be made employees rather than contractors, and receive the benefits mandated by the state of California.


Hundreds of students at Schools of the Sacred Heart in San Francisco are taking part in a nationwide Tech Timeout, challenging students to unplug from digital devices for 72 hours. The private school is laced with technology: more than 700 students from fifth to 12th grade received an iPad in 2013 and most assignments are done digitally, through apps or Google docs. But now they want to teach kids the value of unplugging.

Whether it's making donations and signing petitions online, or using social media to highlight political causes, cyber-activism has never been easier. With a few clicks, we can make our voices heard around the globe. But who's listening, and is anything actually changing? Does cyber-activism mobilize real-world action on the ground, or does it reduce political engagement to simple mouse-clicking and ultimately threaten the subversive nature of change?

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Feb 11, 2015
Larry Zhou

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

LGBT Community Holds "Die In" For SF Transgender Woman Killed in Stabbing // NBC Bay Area

"Hundreds of people came out Tuesday and staged a die-in in front of San Francisco City Hall to honor all those transgender people who have died violent deaths.

Sandip Roy tries to call his mother, but it proves to be more challenging than one would expect.  

Sandip Roy is currently on tour promoting his debut novel, "Don't Let Him Know" published by Bloomsbury.

Hear him read in the bay area this week:

Wed. Feb. 4 at 7:30pm. Kepler's - 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park, CA

Under CC license from Flickr user Master OSM 2011

KALW's Ben Trefny talks with UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Dean Ed Wasserman about how social media and the page views are impacting newsrooms.

ED WASSERMAN: There was a lot of talk about citizen journalists, and the like, but this is really more about citizen editors. And in many respects, that editorial function is a far more powerful and a far more influential one than the actual reporting.

Click the audio player above to listen to the complete interview.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Jan 28, 2015
Bert Johnson / East Bay Express

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Artists Create Two-Way Video Portal for Oaklanders to Meet Their Neighbors // East Bay Express

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