transportation

Isabel Angell

Four people have been killed by cars on Van Ness Avenue in 2014 – more than half of the pedestrian deaths in San Francisco this year.

One ran into traffic after an argument. Another was a hit and run. One didn’t appear to use a crosswalk. Stories like that seem to support the idea that pedestrians are often to blame. But in San Francisco, motorists are at fault in almost two-thirds of pedestrian collisions.

Nicole Schneider is the director of the pedestrian advocacy group Walk San Francisco.

Paying to ride the school bus

Jun 2, 2014
H. Micheal Miley

 

Skyline is one of 15 public high schools in Oakland and the only one located in the hills. The 42-acre campus is nestled among redwoods and million dollar homes.  Nearly 2,000 students attend this traditional campus and many value the diverse student body.  But that wasn’t always the case.

Skyline High opened in 1961, and was almost immediately surrounded by conflict. It’s proposed attendance zone was one mile wide, ten miles long, and based entirely in the hills, which excluded students from the flatlands. This kept the school racially, as well as economically, homogenous -- despite the fact that the city’s black population nearly doubled during the previous decade.

 

When you listen to the radio in your car, you’re listening -- but mostly driving. Your hands are on the wheel, eyes on the road, and you’re aware of the cars around you, your speed, and your environment.But, it’s really easy to take our eyes off the windshield, even just for a second.

 

Real talk: I’m not the biggest fan of San Francisco public transportation. So when I first heard of the alternative transportation network of private buses coursing through the arteries of the city, my ears perked up. Imagine: buses with wifi, plush seats, sun roofs, arriving at reasonable intervals. Surely they had room for one more?

Liz Pfeffer

BART strike continues

Jul 2, 2013

LA Times: BART strike enters Day 2, promising more commuting chaos

Excerpt: “I wish I had news for you, but BART hasn’t offered any new proposals to bring about a resolution, and we’re on the second day of our strike,” said Cecille Isidro, a spokeswoman with Service Employees International Union Local 1021 – one of the two unions striking. “They have not come back with any proposals that address critical safety issues and fair pay.”

BART workers on strike

Jul 1, 2013

Radical Idea: Greening The Wiggle

Jun 18, 2013
Under CC license from Flickr user Paul Krueger

The Wiggle is a San Francisco bike route that zig-zags through the Lower Haight, Alamo Square, and Duboce Park. Activists and community groups have been trying to improve the corridor for years. Their work has led to more "sharrows," green painted bike lanes, on the pavement and most recently an $80-million greening project proposal for The Wiggle Corridor. The plans being considered by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and the Municipal Transit Agency include rain gardens that capture storm water, permeable paving and improved bike lane safety measures. That's a good start to Wigg Party founder Morgan Fitzgibbons. In his ideal world, the city would go a lot further -- as we hear in this Radical Idea from the Crosscurrents archives.

The best commute ever

Feb 7, 2013
Dan Suyeyasu of Oakland

If you met Stephen Linaweaver after 7am, you probably wouldn’t think he’s much different from any other Bay Area professional. He’s 38 years old. He works for a company that does sustainability consulting for corporations. He’s kind of outdoorsy. Whatever.

But if you met him before 7am, you’d definitely think he was unusual. For starters, you’d have to do what I did, which is drive down to the Port of Oakland before dawn and talk with him while he’s getting ready to launch his kayak into the Bay.

There’s one race still up for grabs in the Bay Area: Measure B1, Alameda county’s proposed new transit tax. 

In Downtown San Francisco on Market Street, subtly hidden next to the glitzy Westfield Shopping center, 10 floors above the newly painted green bike lanes, are the offices are the San Francisco Bike Coalition. It’s big and lofty-feeling; there’s a wall filled with hooks for bikes. This is the brain trust of the city’s bike movement. The person in charge is SFBC’s executive director, Leah Shahum. And she has a vision:

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