Trayvon Martin

Todd Whitney

 

If you have walked the streets of the Bay Area recently -- you might have seen posters featuring the names and faces of Oscar Grant, Renisha McBride, Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin, among others. 

Rachael Voorhees / BY-NC-SA

I grew up in a middle-class, suburban county in New Jersey, but now I'm a twenty-something intern living in a low-income part of Washington, D.C. The realtor euphemism for such neighborhoods is “transitional,” a word that implies ongoing change. This is ironic because I feel that so many of the residents here feel as though things will never change, and will always stay the same. Since moving here, I've already become accustomed to the wail of sirens, the disconcerting, yet reassuring pulse of blue and red light through the heavy bars on my windows.

  


Brett Myers

 

I don't know how I should feel about the George Zimmerman verdict. I was the same age as Trayvon Martin when he was killed. It was the first shooting case that got national attention where I felt connected -- like I could relate. When I first heard the story, it seemed clear: Trayvon Martin was young and he was murdered. I thought it would be an open and shut case. As time progressed, it changed. The more information came out, the more complicated the case became. And then the verdict was announced. I wasn’t surprised. But I was emotionless. Should I be angry? Should I be sad? I felt like goop. No shape. No structure.


Kyung Jin Lee

 

Over the past few days, protesters on both sides of the Bay have joined thousands nationally in expressing outrage over George Zimmerman’s acquittal in Florida. Over the weekend, more than 500 people gathered at Oakland’s Frank Ogawa Plaza.

Your Call: Friday Media Roundtable

Jan 18, 2013

On today's Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of the elections in Israel. We’ll also be joined by journalist, Trevor Aaronson, to discuss his new book, The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's manufactured War on Terrorism. Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. Where did you see the best reporting this week? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

AP

Guests: Chris Johson, co-creator the Question Bridge: Black Males exhibit now showing at the Oakland Museum, and professor of photography at the California College of the Arts 

Nubia Bowe, high school graduate and Heal The Streets leadership fellow at the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights

Unity Lewis, hip hop artist, painter, participant in the Question Bridge project

Web Resources:

Ella Baker Center

AP

 On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about why people of color are automatically suspect in our society. The killing of Trayvon Martin has sparked a much needed conversation about these issues. What conversations are you having and hearing? Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. How has this affected your interactions and encounters? And where should this conversation go from here? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.Guests:

Local youth respond to Trayvon Martin's death

Mar 29, 2012
Photo by Colleen Higa

Criminal justice news continues to make national headlines, with the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida. Social networking sites are full of commentary on the killing. Many in the African American community are wondering how to talk to their sons about such tragedies.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/shankbone/6858702888/

Race has played an increasingly large role in the case involving the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black 17-year-old boy who was killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer last month in Sanford, Florida.

On today's Your Call we’ll talk about neighborhood watch and "Stand Your Ground" laws. There are 21 around the country, including Florida, where, on February 26, Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager, was shot to death by 28-year-old George Zimmerman. After an outcry over the failure to arrest Zimmerman, Justice Department officials stepped in. How do so-called “Shoot First” laws work? What would justice in this case look like? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you. 

Guests: