UC Berkeley

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Sep 23, 2015

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW:

Buying Support for Coal // East Bay Express 

Daily News Roundup for Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Sep 2, 2015
Paul Chinn

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

Lawsuit filed by California drivers against Uber gets class-action status // CBS SF

“SAN FRANCISCO (CBS / AP) — A federal judge has granted class-action status to a case in California against Uber over payment of drivers.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Jun 30, 2015
Carlos Avila Gonzalez / The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:


California legislature passes strict school vaccine bill // KRON


“State lawmakers on Monday sent Gov. Jerry Brown a controversial vaccine bill that would impose one of the strictest school immunizations laws in the country.

Gabrielle Lurie / Special to the Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California death penalty: New execution method will be proposed // San Jose Mercury 

"California's death penalty system, dormant for nine years, might soon move slowly toward resuming executions.

The LA Times recently published an editorial that reported that California’s reservoirs are currently storing only about a year’s worth of water supply. Significant storms could still add to that supply, but it’s daunting data, coming at the tail end of the traditional wet season.

There’s a science to happiness. And one of the centers for its study is right here in the Bay Area.

The Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley studies human happiness, compassion and altruism. KALW's Hana Baba wanted to find out the formula, so she went to the center and sat down with its co-director Dacher Keltner, author of the book, Born To Be Good.

Daily news roundup for Monday, February 9 , 2015

Feb 9, 2015
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Under CC license from Flickr user Charlie Nguyen.

The University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is one of the most prestigious in the country. It’s not cheap: it costs more than $15,000 per year for California residents and twice that for out-of-state students. And last month, the Board of Regents made it even more expensive, charging an extra $7,500 per year. 

Under CC license from Flickr user Master OSM 2011

KALW's Ben Trefny talks with UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Dean Ed Wasserman about how social media and the page views are impacting newsrooms.

ED WASSERMAN: There was a lot of talk about citizen journalists, and the like, but this is really more about citizen editors. And in many respects, that editorial function is a far more powerful and a far more influential one than the actual reporting.

Click the audio player above to listen to the complete interview.

Under CC license from Flickr user Thierry Chervel.

KALW's Ben Trefny talks with UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Dean Ed Wasserman about how terrorist attacks on media, the use of satire, and free speech.

Liz Mak


Sexual assault on college campuses is a topic that's difficult to escape right now. That's partly because earlier this year, the Department of Education released a list of 55 college campuses facing investigation for failing to take sexual assault reports seriously.

Michele Chelone

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.



On today’s Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the recent two-day strike by the UC Student-Workers Union. Earlier this month, students hit the picket line accusing UC administrators of unfair labor practices and intimidation, including threats to take away visas for grad student protesters and fire those who strike. What’s next for these grad students and what are their demands? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Laura Flynn



Titicut Follies was Frederick Wiseman’s first and most famous documentary movie. The controversial 1967 film details the degrading treatment of patients at a Massachusetts hospital for the criminally insane.

An urban farm collaborative grows in Albany

Dec 18, 2013

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Why black students are avoiding UC Berkeley

Nov 7, 2013

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

The University of California system saw a major change in administration earlier this summer when Janet Napolitano was appointed president. When she takes office in September, the former Homeland Security Secretary will be the first woman to hold the presidential position.

UC Berkeley’s administration also experienced a change this past June when Nicholas Dirks was sworn in as the university’s chancellor, the faculty’s highest ranking position. One of Dirks’ primary obligations in his new role is to find new funding for the university. The numbers are stark. Ten years ago, a semester for a resident undergraduate cost less than $3,000 and about a third of the school’s funding came from the state. This semester, the state provides only about 11 percent of the funding and tuition is two and a half times higher. 

Luis Flores

Tucked away in the student center at University of California Berkeley, the Undocumented Student Program is designed to be a national model. It makes college possible for students without legal status.


Poems Under the Dome // Go to San Francisco's City Hall to celebrate National Poetry Month. It’s an open-mike event, so bring something to recite, or just listen. It’ll be sheer poetry in either case. // DETAILS: Poems Under the Dome, City Hall, San Francisco, April 18, 5:30pm. Cost: FREE


(SF Bay Guardian) // Creative, artistically minded people are leaving San Francisco in search of affordable housing in the East Bay. Oakland is fast becoming the new hip location for the working class and young artists driven out of San Francisco by sky-rocketing rents. Oakland City Council member Rebecca Kaplan says those moving into Oakland and surrounding East Bay cities are of many different ethnicities including Ethiopian, Eritrean, and Vietnamese...

(LA Times) // High-Speed Rail construction is facing challenges over its environmental impact on both air quality and endangered species. Concerns include the problematic air quality in the San Joaquin Valley where about 1 out of 7 children have been diagnosed with asthma, and federal biologists say 11 endangered species will be impacted.

(San Jose Mercury News) // There are still 1 million votes left to tally in the vote for Proposition 29, the San Jose Mercury News projects a loss for the proposed cigarette tax hike. A vast majority of the votes left uncounted come from districts in the southern part of the state, where there was less support for the initiative to raise the state tax on packs of cigarettes to $1...

Whenever people gather, ideas seem to flow more freely when they take place around a table that includes some “refreshments.” This was part of the idea behind a tea party, or a salon, where a witty host brought together friends for art appreciation and clever conversation.

(Bay Citizen) // UC Berkeley has filed a trespass lawsuit against 14 people who they claim illegally occupied a tract of land in Albany for the past two and a half weeks. The protesters are calling their movement "Occupy the Farm" and are planting vegetables on the 10-acre parcel of land. The university says the lawsuit is meant to ensure that the trespassers, rather than taxpayers, will bear the expenses of damage to the land...

(East Bay Express) // Controversy is brewing over the certification of fair-trade coffee at the Oakland-based agency Fair Trade USA. The agency's recent decision to start certifying larger coffee plantations has smaller coops and farms fearing that they will be put out of business. Fair Trade USA argues that the expansion will increase the impact of fair trade...

The $18 billion foreclosure settlement announced last month for struggling California homeowners could take years to materialize. The nation's five largest mortgage servicers have three years to deliver mortgage relief to troubled borrowers, with no penalties for noncompliance until 2015...

Last month on the show, we aired a story about the controversy over how UC Berkeley is a center for unearthing and studying the remains of native Californians. UC Berkeley In it, Professor Tim White says of the study of native remains:

“It is a holistic study, just like a crime scene investigation, but these are very cold cases with very ancient evidence."

Disabled artist finds human connection in canvas

Mar 8, 2012

“It’s not possible for me to be, to render things perfectly realistically and get fine, fine details,” says painter Tim Lynn. “And I end up getting a lot of accidents, which are often the best part of the painting. Drips and smears and smudges.”

Lynn describes himself as an expressionist painter – one who applies abstract expressionism techniques to figurative painting. His style can be described as bold and loose. The son of Bay Area artists, Lynn works from his studio in Berkeley, California. But to be an artist, he must overcome significant physical obstacles.


UC Berkeley is home to the country’s second largest collection of human skeletons outside of a graveyard, about 12 thousand total. Some are thousands of years old. The University has unearthed and studied these remains for centuries. They’ve taught researchers a great deal about California’s prehistoric past.