unions

Labor and Employment Law: Trends with Labor Relations, Unions, and the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).
Guests: Labor and Employment Law Attorneys -- Thomas Lenz (who  represents employers) and Caren Sencer (who represents labor unions and employees).
Listeners with questions for Chuck and his guests, please call 415-841-4134.



Isabel Angell

Over half of Bay Area residents support a ban on transit strikes, bucking the region’s pro-union reputation, reveals a new Field Poll. The rest of the state is split, but more Californians still believe public transit workers should have the right to strike.

Labor Notes

  

If you're still trying to understand what exactly BART and its unions are fighting over, you're not alone. Obviously, the fight is over compensation, but many of us are unclear as to what each party is really asking of the other. Even bargaining representatives on both sides are having a hard time agreeing on the factual differences between their own proposals. Last Wednesday, union and management teams sat down just to clarify some of their financial assumptions — assumptions that have led to multimillion-dollar disagreements over what each side is truly proposing.

East Bay Express: Unionizing Nonprofits

Aug 8, 2013

When employees of Larkin Street Youth Services in San Francisco began talking about unionizing earlier this spring, their concerns centered on issues familiar to workers of all stripes: understaffed departments, increased workloads, benefit cuts, high turnover. Although an attempt to unionize in October 2010 was unsuccessful, most employees at the homeless services nonprofit believed that the effort would end differently this time around.


BART has asked a state mediator to step in and help the stalled labor talks between the Bay Area transit agency and its five unions. The mediator, which unions have welcomed as well, is scheduled to start next week. The current labor contract expires on June 30.

Labor unions have a big stake in immigration reform

May 1, 2013
Adrian Florido

As head of the 800,000-member Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, Maria Elena Durazo is one of the nation’s most powerful union leaders, and a key player in the ongoing immigration reform negotiations. But before her current post, she led a hotel workers’ union. She said one of the hardest parts of the job was convincing workers who were in the country illegally to organize. They feared they could be easily fired, and she said that fear had rippling implications.

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