veterans

Vets Vs Hate

 


On the August 3rd edition of Your Call, we’re talking about what happens to veterans once they return home.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Jul 5, 2016
By Mark Ordonez / Flickr/cropped and resized

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:
 
San Francisco Considers Tax on Tech Companies to Pay for Boom’s Downside // New York Times

Courtesy of the artist/ Resized and cropped

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene through the eyes and ears of local artists. Our guest is Dawline-Jane Oni-Eseleh, an artist and illustrator with work in two exhibits: Home at Pro Arts Gallery  in Oakland and  No Heroes Allowed at Art Attack SF in San Francisco. 

Used under license from Creative Commons

Supreme Court tosses marijuana case … Canada ruffles U.N. narcotics conference … “Massive recall” of pot over pesticides … Vets risk felonies … Sports, opinion, and infused Nutella ….

LEGALIZATION & LEGISLATION

Canada shakes up the U.N. narcotics conference // National Post

Returning Home: Voices from the Front

Nov 11, 2015
All rights reserved

What is it like to be a student who has fought in a war? In this special production from the Stanford Storytelling Project, six students and alumni, all veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, tell their stories.  

Angela Johnston

This story originally aired on December 9, 2014.

At the Livermore Veteran’s Hospital, there are a few animals residents can see: wild turkeys that run around the grounds, rattlesnakes that hide out in the dry grass, and therapy dogs that make weekly visits. But there’s one animal in particular that Bryce Lee is always happy to see: a baby harp seal.

Marcy Fraser / KALW

 


Jacqueline Cooper is a lot like you.

“I'm not any different than anybody else,” she says. “I'm a mother, I'm a daughter, I'm a sister, a wife at one point.”

However, there’s more to her than that. For one, she’s a retired United States Marine Corps sergeant. For another, she’s dealt with mental illness throughout her life.

Reveal 3, the latest pilot from the Peabody Award-winning program produced by The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX.

In this episode: an investigation into accidents and equipment failures in the military; a collaborative investigation into US water standards; and another in CIR's series of investigations into the treatment of military veterans.

Friday, July 4th at 11am and Monday, July 7th at 7pm.

Your Call: Veterans and Post-traumatic stress disorder

Apr 11, 2014

  

CCSF Veterans Alliance

Aundray Rogers spent eight years in the Army – serving in Iraq, Kosovo and Kuwait – before returning to civilian life five years ago. He's now the president of the Veterans Alliance and the Veterans Resource Center at City College of San Francisco, which currently serves about 1,300 student veterans.

A combat veteran and a veteran of the streets deal with PTSD

Nov 11, 2013
Nigel Poor

KALW has partnered with radio producers inside California's oldest prison to bring you the San Quentin Prison Report, a series of stories focusing on the experiences of these men, written and produced by those living inside the prison's walls.

Many veterans suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder --  a type of anxiety disorder that can occur after you have seen or experienced a traumatic event. About 30% of Iraq and Afghanistan vets treated by the VA are diagnosed with PTSD, but PTSD is not just a veterans’ issue. Today we’ll hear from a former marine who survived the trauma of military warfare and a man who survived the trauma and violence that came with growing up in San Francisco’s inner city. Both men are serving time at San Quentin State Prison. Even though they come from different backgrounds, their experiences with PTSD are similar.

Liz Pfeffer


California has the largest concentration of homeless veterans in the nation, and in San Francisco, it’s likely that more than 700 homeless vets will sleep on the street or in shelters this Veterans Day. 

According to Bevan Dufty, director of San Francisco’s Housing, Opportunity, Partnerships and Engagement (HOPE) program, housing homeless veterans is a high priority for the city. And the number of homeless veterans has decreased since last year, thanks in part to the opening of a permanent supportive housing facility called Veterans Commons.

On today's Your Call, we'll have a conversation about how veterans are navigating the VA system. More than a million vets are currently waiting for their benefits claims to be processed. And the average wait time is 273 days. We’ve heard these stories for years. Why is this still happening? Join us at 10 or post a comment here. President Obama had promised to revamp what he calls a “broken VA bureaucracy.” So what has changed under his administration? It's Your Call with Holly Kernan and You.

Guest:

Since 2001, about 2.5 million people have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, at least a third of them more than once. When they return, many veterans need long term physical and mental care. But they often don't get it.

The Ripple Effects of PTSD

May 13, 2013

What veterans have seen at war doesn’t just affect them – it also affects the people around them. Journalist Mac McClelland has been reporting on how Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) affects families and how they cope when very little treatment is available. KALW’s Casey Miner interviews McClelland about her recent article in Mother Jones magazine titled, “Is PTSD contagious?” 

www.cironline.org

Aaron Glantz is a reporter with the Center for Investigative Reporting and author of the book, The War Comes Home. He talked with KALW about what makes the transition to civilian life so hard.

For many of us, ten years can seem like a long time. Things that happened a decade ago feel far away. But for veterans of the Iraq war, and their families, ten years can feel like very little – because the damage wrought by that war is still right there with them.

The older we get, the harder it is to think of ourselves as “old.” But as far as the government is concerned – specifically, the federal corrections system – you’re “aging” or “elderly” once you turn 50. California houses one of the country’s biggest populations of elderly prisoners. And gradually, it also releases them.

Photo by Mariel Waloff

Many San Francisco veterans remain homeless or in transitional housing. Rudy Nevarez, a 66 year-old Vietnam veteran, has been living in transitional housing on Treasure Island for two years. The program, run by Swords to Plowshares, is intended to last two years. After that participants need to find their own housing. Nevarez applied for a HUD-VASH voucher several months ago but was turned down. Swords to Plowshares is letting him stay in the program for an extra 90 days, but then he needs to find another place to live.

Mariel Waloff

Finding an apartment in San Francisco these days is an uphill battle on any kind of budget. Craigslist ads and open houses can provoke hundreds of responses from people ready to compete for their share of the city’s scarce square footage, even at times willing to pay for months of rent in advance. For people without cash, things are a lot harder. Among those who find it most difficult are chronically homeless veterans.