Vietnam

G7 2016 Ise-Shima Summit

 On the May 27th edition of Your Call, it’s our media roundtable. This week we’ll discuss coverage of President Obama’s visits to Vietnam and Japan. 

First Days: Thu-Thuy Truong

Oct 1, 2015
Thu-Thuy Truong

 


 

This week, we’ve brought you stories of what it’s like to arrive in America. As young children, brother and sister Thu-Thuy Truong and Sy Truong fled with their family from their war-torn home of Vietnam to a refugee camp in Arkansas. They eventually settled in the East Bay. 

Under CC license from Flickr user Ken Lund.

 

Thuylynh Nguyen’s family came to the U.S. from Vietnam in order to escape political persecution. Her father had spent eight years as a prisoner of war after serving as a soldier in the South Vietnamese army. The U.S. granted her family asylum in 1991.

The immigrant experience is meant to be a smooth one, full of promise. Ideally, people from developing countries come to America for better work, education, human rights and, overall, and a better future for their children.

However, many of these stories turn out to be not as polished as that narrative. Immigrants often need to learn a new language, navigate a new system, face realities they never have before, and find their way in a new adopted country. Their hopes are high, and sometimes they end up unmet.

 

 

Host: Joseph Pace

Producer: Yumi Wilson

The war in Vietnam ended more than 30 years ago, but the legacy of Agent Orange remains, both here in the United States and in Vietnam.