violence

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


On the November 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call:  Monday night's announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri had decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the killing of unarmed black youth Michael Brown led to outrage and protest nationwide.  President Obama and Michael Brown's parents called for peaceful protest -- but what does that mean, and how far should it go?  What will keep the focus on continued racial inequities in policing?  And how does the story of Ferguson resonate in the Bay Area and Northern California? 

Anna Kolhede

In the South of Market neighborhood of San Francisco, at 1038 Howard Street, sits the United Playaz headquarters. United Playaz is an homegrown organization that’s trying to make the SoMa neighborhood a safer place. It was founded by Rudy Corpuz Jr., but he wasn’t always an anti-violence activist.

“I got tired of going in and out of jail. I got tired of waking up at people’s houses that were dope houses. I got tired of being on the streets where I didn’t know where I was going to be at, you know what I mean, the next day because I was living foul.”

Eric Hannan was only supposed to work as the 81st Avenue Library's Teen Service Director for a few weeks. He ended up staying two years.

California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

Youth Radio: "When did violence become so normal?"

Aug 8, 2012
Flickr user ControlArms, under CC License / http://www.flickr.com/photos/controlarms/7685194436/

Since the Aurora, Colorado shooting, I keep asking myself: when did violence became so normal? It pops up everywhere in American culture. We feel excited it by it when we see it on a screen. We feel proud of it when we see it in uniform, and angered by it when we see it near our children.

Courtesy of The Spot

More of a police presence and better police community relations are good ways to prevent violence, but a group of young men in Oakland are trying a different approach. They call themselves "Warriors for Peace,” and they are part of a violence prevention program that equips and trains teens to make films about Oakland. The hope is that from behind a lens, they will see their city, and themselves, a little differently.