water

 

California’s recent six-year drought was the worst the region had experienced in over 500 years.

Water restrictions imposed by the state during the drought led many residents to start collecting water themselves, with buckets in their showers, rain barrels in the yard, or more complicated rainwater storage contraptions.

Homeowners who installed rainwater capture systems to conserve water may have had to pay higher property taxes as a result. That’s because constructing these systems can count as a property improvement.

 

Prop 68 is all about the environment. It’s known as the Parks, Environment, and Water Bond. 

 

And if it’s approved, it would collect over $4 billion for those issues.

 

In the next installment of our ongoing series on sustainable food production, host Ethan Elkind focuses on water.  What does uncertainty around water supplies mean for California farmers?  

Last Wednesday, California's water officials announced water allocations based on snow pack measurements, reviving concerns about the environment, urban vs. agricultural water needs, and the need to prepare for a future with a less reliable water supply. 

Does water scarcity put our agricultural industry at risk?  Is there legislation that can help?

rent Davis Bailey / The California Sunday Magazine

On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll discuss water in California. Award winning journalist Marx Arax has written a lengthy piece in the California Sunday Magazine about Stewart Resnick, one of most powerful farmers in the US, and the largest single water user in the Western United States.

Angela Johnston / KALW News

 

In hundreds of communities across the state, the water coming out of the tap is still not drinkable. Many of these places are small, rural, and economically disadvantaged — the bulk of them are located in the Central Valley. But the Bay Area isn’t immune, and the solutions aren’t easy.

Angela Johnston

 

Ben Durkee is a true Trinity local. He’s lived and worked in the Northern California county his entire life.  

Philosophy Talk: Food Justice

Oct 6, 2017

With the amount of food we produce and consume, why do so many people still go hungry?


Flickr user J R under CC BY 2.0

 

From switching to renewable energy to battery storage, to taxing drinking water. Out of the hundreds of bills that the California Assembly debated in the final hours of the legislative session this month, many dealt with water, climate change, and the environment. KALW's energy and environment reporter Angela Johnston shares some of the key environmental legislation now sitting on Governor Brown’s desk, and the ones that didn’t make it there.

Lisa Morehouse

Water is the defining feature of the Delta, and recreation on the water is a big part of the economy and culture of this place.

Tony George

 

Pretend you’re looking at a map of the Bay Area, then scroll out a bit.  Find Martinez and Benicia, and draw a line east to Stockton.  From there, go north to Sacramento, then back to Martinez.  Look closely at that triangle and you’ll see a puzzle of waterways and islands that make up the California Delta.

Angela Johnston

If you stand on the edge of the Almaden Dam in San Jose right now, you can feel the ground violently shaking and vibrating beneath your feet. It’s the result of thousands of cubic feet of water rushing out of the reservoir, down into a creek, flowing into the bay. The water’s being released to keep the reservoir from overflowing.

Will the water come back to Okieville, California?

Feb 15, 2017
Sarah Craig

The small hamlet of Okieville got its name from those who headed to California to escape the 1930s Dust Bowl. Today, Okieville is one of the areas hardest hit by California’s current drought.

Angela Johnston

 


When you exit Highway 101 into East Palo Alto, there’s a construction site you just can’t miss. It’s a big, brick, three-story building with huge glass windows. By early next year this building should be home to a company, and the builders hope it’s a tech startup.

Angela Johnston

 

The California drought is now in it’s fifth year, and a recent study says it won’t be over for years to come. The study analyzed California’s mountain snowpack and found that we’d need almost four and a half more years of winter storms to escape drought conditions.  

Witching to find water

Aug 9, 2016
Photo courtesy of Marc Mondavi

Five years of drought has forced California farmers and wine makers to turn from the sky to the ground to find water. It’s down there, but you have to know exactly where it is in order to drill a well.  

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, July 28, 2016

Jul 28, 2016
FLICKR USER Janeen, USED UNDER CC / RESIZED AND CROPPED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Silicon Valley Elites Get Home Loans With No Money Down // Bloomberg

“It turns out that even the well-off need help in a housing market as crazy as the one in the San Francisco Bay area, and lenders are elbowing each other in a rush to provide it.

Under creative commons license from Flickr user eugene_o // resized and cropped

 

The Sacramento San-Joaquin Delta is the state’s biggest water supply, providing water for 25 million people. It’s also the most contested. Northern and Southern Californians have been fighting over who’s entitled to that water for more than a century. Right now, the latest battle is playing out. The largest water supplier in the country—Metropolitan Water District—has made a bid to buy 20 thousand acres of land in the Delta.

Your Call: Looming global water shortage

Jun 1, 2016
Judd McCullum / used under CC / flickr

 On the June 1st edition of Your Call, we'll discuss the global water crisis. 

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, May 26, 2016

May 26, 2016
by Robert Campbell - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library, used under CC BY-SA 3.0 // Cropped

Rising reality // San Francisco Chronicle

"Fifty years ago, Bay Area residents rallied around the call to save San Francisco Bay. Public action on an unprecedented scale reversed development tides that for more than a century had covered shallow waters with land for industrial parks and housing tracts, roadways and garbage dumps.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Mar 16, 2016

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

Bay Area reservoirs still far from full: Conservation experts hope that drought lessons last // San Mateo Daily Journal

Are we close to getting out of the drought?

Feb 2, 2016
Flickr user Daniel Hoherd under CC license. Resized/cropped.

 

Any day now, The California State Water Resources Control Board will vote on whether to extend Governor Jerry Brown’s mandatory restrictions on water use.

Felicia Marcus tells us how she manages multiple interests for one of the earth's most precious (and dwindling) resources.

Todd Whitney

Despite the recent rain and projections that El Niño is on its way, there’s little chance that the storms will end California’s drought. At least, Governor Brown’s not counting on it.

Saving water, one flush at a time

Nov 10, 2015
Catherine Girardeau

Nobody at my house is very handy, so when there are plumbing issues, we go for the workarounds: like plunging, and putting buckets under leaky faucets to catch the drips and using the buckets to flush the toilets. 

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Sep 16, 2015
Youtube / SFGate

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

SFMTA says it needs $21 billion for next 20 years // SF Examiner

"Money makes transit go ’round. And in San Francisco, a new number has been identified to do just that: $21 billion.

On the July 13th edition of Your Call, we’ll kick of a weeklong series on solutions to California’s water crisis by exploring how the world's most water-efficient cities have reduced demand.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, June 25, 2015

Jun 25, 2015
Johanna Varner / KQED Science

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Reductions to bail rates divide S.F. legal community // SF Chronicle

"An attempt by San Francisco Superior Court judges to bring bail amounts into line with surrounding Bay Area counties has set off a firestorm of controversy in the legal community.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Jun 24, 2015
Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Ominous new cracks found on Bay Bridge rods// SFGate

"Tiny cracks found on some of the rods on the new Bay Bridge tower potentially endanger the rest of the more than 400 remaining fasteners that secure the tower to the foundation in an earthquake, Caltrans officials said Tuesday.

Reuters / Nacho Doce

One the May 8th edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss media coverage of California’s drought.

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