water

 On the July 23rd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with biologist Wallace Nichols about his new book, Blue Mind. Nichols explores how we are beginning to learn that our brains are hardwired to react positively to water and that being near it can calm and connect us, increase innovation and insight and even heal what’s broken. What do we need to know about the power of water? On the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar.

Guests:

Wallace Nichols, scientist, wild water advocate, community organizer and author

Reveal 3, the latest pilot from the Peabody Award-winning program produced by The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX.

In this episode: an investigation into accidents and equipment failures in the military; a collaborative investigation into US water standards; and another in CIR's series of investigations into the treatment of military veterans.

Friday, July 4th at 11am and Monday, July 7th at 7pm.

Fighting the Mission Bay blaze

Mar 13, 2014
Kenneth Smith

Two days ago, the San Francisco skyline was covered in thick black smoke. It came from a fire that tore through a construction site in the Mission Bay neighborhood. 

Tuesday’s five alarm fire was the biggest the city has seen since 2012. Ultimately, 150 firefighters responded, with almost 50 vehicles, and they used a lot of water. 

KALW’s Ben Trefny spoke with Mindy Talmidge, the Public Information Officer at the San Francisco Fire Department, to get a sense of how they take on a blaze this big, where the water had to come from, and and how much water it took to fight it.

Courtesty of the Pacific Institute

As California faces an extreme drought, water politics are under a microscope now more than ever. Oakland-based Pacific Institute is a leader in research on the impacts of climate change on water. Its director, Peter Gleick, was awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship for his work on water resources.

Even though 38 million Californians cook, clean and bathe with water, the Central Valley is still the largest user by far, taking up 75 percent of the state's water supply. Gleick sat down with KALW's Ben Trefny to decipher the state's water issues. 

  


How much more water can the Bay Area conserve?

Mar 28, 2013
www5.sfgov.org

Advocates say that by mid-century the Bay Area will not have enough water to meet its needs without increasing supply or curbing demand. What more can local agencies and consumers do to conserve water, and can conservation alone help us avoid extreme water scarcity? Is water too cheap? What will it take to convince us all to adopt more water-efficient practices?


Restoring John Muir's Hetch Hetchy: Is It Worth It?

Aug 8, 2012

It’s been nearly 100 years since Congress authorized the City of San Francisco to build the O’Shaughnessy Dam in Yosemite National Park. This is the dam that turned Hetch Hetchy Valley into Hetch Hetchy reservoir, providing water and electricity to San Francisco and surrounding cities. John Muir and a emerging Sierra Club fought against this project proposal for nearly 12 years before Congress passed the Raker Act in 1913, giving San Francisco the authority to build the dam, power generators, and delivery system to the Bay Area.

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about what’s in our water. In Tulare County, one of the poorest counties in California, the State Water Resources Control Board found that 75% of the wells tested contained at least one contaminant over the legal limit.  Do you know what’s in your drinking water?   Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. What chemicals should we be most concerned about?  Are filters necessary? And how do they work? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and You.

Guests

Pages