water

5:50pm

Thu March 12, 2015
Health, Science, Environment

The lifecycle of toilet water at the PUC

The plants outside the PUC
Hana Baba

You may have walked by the beautiful green plants growing outside the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission on Polk Street and not thought much about them. But these plants get their nourishment from our waste.

Along the outer perimeter of the building, there are rectangular planters that are irrigated by reused waste water, or ‘black water’. Black water includes toilet water, urinal water, bathroom and sink water.

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5:45pm

Thu March 12, 2015
Health, Science, Environment

What's it going to take to get out of the drought?

Lake Shasta, California's largest reservoir.
Under CC license from Flickr user Janet Ciucci

California is entering its fourth year of drought – and it’s really starting to show in some of the state’s most vital water resources. The Central Valley Project, which supplies water for about a third of California’s farmland, recently announced it had no water to give. That means those farmers will have to seek water elsewhere or let fields go fallow. About six percent of available farmland went unplanted last year due to the drought, resulting in more than $1 billion in lost revenue. The dire situation has left farmers and regular folks alike wondering when’s it going to end.

KALW’s Audrey Dilling has been looking into how much water it would take to get us out of this drought. She joined KALW’s Hana Baba in studio to talk about what she learned.

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5:38pm

Thu March 12, 2015
Health, Science, Environment

A trip to the San Pablo Reservoir

San Pablo Reservoir
Todd Whitney


Turning on your faucet may be easy, but the process of getting you that water is anything but. Water has a long journey to get to your tap, often starting in the mountains, traveling through aqueducts, and stopping over in reservoirs along the way. The reservoirs that hold our water can sometimes take on a life of their own, supporting whole ecosystems of animals and plants. 

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5:00pm

Thu March 12, 2015
Arts & Culture

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Sunol Water Temple

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

This auditory guessing game is part of Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the sonic signature of each of the Bay Area’s nine counties. By using the sounds of voices, nature, industry, and music, Audiograph tells the story of where you live, and the people who live there with you. Every Thursday, we reveal the origins of that week's sound on Crosscurrents, and here in weekly blog posts.

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5:31pm

Thu January 29, 2015
Health, Science, Environment

Stanford considering the fate of century-old dam threatening endangered trout

Seasrsville Dam
Wikimedia commons user Gazebo

 

The Searsville Dam is causing big trouble on the peninsula. The 122-year-old, 65-foot-tall dam is closed to the public, hidden away on 1,200 acres owned by Stanford University.

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