women

We all know the stereotypes, but the traditional family roles have shifted. Almost half of women are now the primary breadwinners for their households. On this episode, find out how women--and men--and moms and dads, are handling this tectonic change both at home and financially. We'll talk to Izzy Chan, director of The Big Flip and Laura Pilz of Merrill Lynch.

Philosophy Talk asks: What can non-violence really achieve?

Apr 10, 2015

We all hope for peace. Yet in the face of violence, it often seems the only recourse is more violence. Advocates of non-violence claim it’s not necessary to respond to war in kind, and that responding violently, even in self-defense, just perpetuates the cycle of violence. So how can we practice non-violence under the direct threat of violence? Can non-violent acts be spread to stop aggression and war? And are there times when violence is, in fact, necessary?

What does it take for women to succeed in the restaurant business in the San Francisco Bay Area, one of the most competitive restaurant markets in the country? In a $683 billion industry across the US, less than 5% of restaurant owners and chefs are women.

Meet Tanya Holland of Brown Sugar Kitchen in Oakland, CA and Ann Wheat of Millennium Restaurant in San Francisco--named the number one vegan restaurant in the world. The grit required of women to succeed in the restaurant business.

That's our inflection point.

Who are your favorite rad American women? On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about City Lights’ first children’s book Rad American Women A-Z: Rebels, Trailblazers, and Visionaries who Shaped Our History . . . and Our Future!  Writer by Kate Schatz and illustrator Miriam Klein Stahl chose 26 famous and unsung heroines. A is for Angela Davis, E is for Ella Baker, and P is for Patti Smith. Who would you add to the list? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her graduating class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math-- known as STEM.

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