women

7:00pm

Wed June 11, 2014
Education

Interview with Kathleen Cha former AAUW president

Kathleen Cha, former AAUW president, at a April 2013 conference in Hawaii
AAUW website

Education has always played a key role in social change, but it hasn’t always been equally available to both men and women. In the late 1800’s less than 1% of women between the ages of 18 to 24 were in college. College-educated women knew they were privileged, and decided to use that power to work for social justice. They created what became known as the American Association of University Women (AAUW). The San Francisco chapter is the oldest branch in California, and the third oldest in the country.

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12:00am

Thu June 5, 2014

7:07pm

Thu May 8, 2014
Arts & Culture

Barbecue of the Body: Sudanese women bring ritual to Bay Area

Hana Baba

In Sudan, where my family is from, there is an ancient beauty ritual that married women perform called dukhan. It’s like a sauna, but with smoke. 

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7:30pm

Wed April 30, 2014
Economy/Labor/Biz

Women in STEM: Interview with Stanford math education researcher Jo Boaler

Back in 1992, toy company Mattel nearly had to recall its “Teen Talk” Barbie. Women’s groups protested the doll’s use of the phrase “Math class is tough.” They called it out for indirectly perpetuating a harmful stereotype-- that boys and men are better at math than girls and women. Research -- especially over the last 10 years -- has shown there is no innate difference in math ability between males and females. And yet the stereotype persists. Women earn 43% of all college math degrees, yet their presence is scarce in the higher echelons of mathematics.

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11:06am

Thu April 10, 2014
Arts & Culture

The Spot 4.10.14 Title TK + 400,000 Stars

"Pickering's harem"
Harvard College Observatory Collection of Astronomical Photographs

99% Invisible "Title TK" The name is important. It’s the first thing of any product you use or buy or see. The tip of the spear.  Only the names that are most interesting and most pleasant on the tongue can survive in your memory. So it’s no surprise that companies—especially large ones like Sony or Procter & Gamble—hire naming companies.

The Memory Palace: "400,000 Stars"

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