women

Photo by Victoria Stevens

Dubbed the “Queen of the Indies,” Parker Posey has appeared in nearly 90 films and television productions, 

We all know the stereotypes, but the traditional family roles have shifted. Almost half of women are now the primary breadwinners for their households. On this episode, find out how women--and men--and moms and dads, are handling this tectonic change both at home and financially. We'll talk to Izzy Chan, director of The Big Flip and Laura Pilz of Merrill Lynch.

Philosophy Talk asks: What can non-violence really achieve?

Apr 10, 2015

We all hope for peace. Yet in the face of violence, it often seems the only recourse is more violence. Advocates of non-violence claim it’s not necessary to respond to war in kind, and that responding violently, even in self-defense, just perpetuates the cycle of violence. So how can we practice non-violence under the direct threat of violence? Can non-violent acts be spread to stop aggression and war? And are there times when violence is, in fact, necessary?

What does it take for women to succeed in the restaurant business in the San Francisco Bay Area, one of the most competitive restaurant markets in the country? In a $683 billion industry across the US, less than 5% of restaurant owners and chefs are women.

Meet Tanya Holland of Brown Sugar Kitchen in Oakland, CA and Ann Wheat of Millennium Restaurant in San Francisco--named the number one vegan restaurant in the world. The grit required of women to succeed in the restaurant business.

That's our inflection point.

Who are your favorite rad American women? On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about City Lights’ first children’s book Rad American Women A-Z: Rebels, Trailblazers, and Visionaries who Shaped Our History . . . and Our Future!  Writer by Kate Schatz and illustrator Miriam Klein Stahl chose 26 famous and unsung heroines. A is for Angela Davis, E is for Ella Baker, and P is for Patti Smith. Who would you add to the list? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her graduating class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math-- known as STEM.

Hana Baba

In Sudan, where my family is from, there is an ancient beauty ritual that married women perform called dukhan. It’s like a sauna, but with smoke. 

  

Who are police today? On the January 21st edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race and justice with a conversation about police departments across the country. The total number of minority police officers has risen, but they’re concentrated in larger cities. The percentage of white cops is more than 30 points higher than in the communities they serve, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. What does the police force look like in your area? It's Your Call, with me, Rose Aguilar, and you.

Angela Johnston

Ellen Frankel slips the last of her quarters into the Medieval Madness pinball machine and wipes the sweat off her forehead. It’s her second game of the night, and she’s trying to get a new high score. Although she is shy to admit it, Frankel is a real pinball wizard.

Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. The answer came in April of 2011, when she launched a company called Black Girls Code to teach girls how to build their own websites, make computer games, and train them for careers in the tech industry. Kimberly Bryant and her daughter, Kai, who has been through the program, joined KALW’s Hana Baba in the studio.

AAUW website

Education has always played a key role in social change, but it hasn’t always been equally available to both men and women. In the late 1800’s less than 1% of women between the ages of 18 to 24 were in college. College-educated women knew they were privileged, and decided to use that power to work for social justice. They created what became known as the American Association of University Women (AAUW). The San Francisco chapter is the oldest branch in California, and the third oldest in the country.

Your Call: How can men oppose misogyny?

Jun 5, 2014


Back in 1992, toy company Mattel nearly had to recall its “Teen Talk” Barbie. Women’s groups protested the doll’s use of the phrase “Math class is tough.” They called it out for indirectly perpetuating a harmful stereotype-- that boys and men are better at math than girls and women. Research -- especially over the last 10 years -- has shown there is no innate difference in math ability between males and females. And yet the stereotype persists. Women earn 43% of all college math degrees, yet their presence is scarce in the higher echelons of mathematics.

Harvard College Observatory Collection of Astronomical Photographs

99% Invisible "Title TK" The name is important. It’s the first thing of any product you use or buy or see. The tip of the spear.  Only the names that are most interesting and most pleasant on the tongue can survive in your memory. So it’s no surprise that companies—especially large ones like Sony or Procter & Gamble—hire naming companies.

The Memory Palace: "400,000 Stars"

You've probably been seeing this next band around town for a while, on line-ups at clubs like Bottom of the Hill and The Independent. They've been playing the show circuit for over four years and have a following that stretches as far as London, England. 

What does gender have to do with science? The obvious answer is ‘nothing.’ Science is the epitome of an objective, rational, and disinterested enterprise. But has male dominance in science contributed certain unfounded assumptions or cognitive biases to the ‘objectivity’ of scientific inquiry? Is there any possibility of achieving a gender-neutral science, and if so, what would that look like?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dcysurfer/3274321844/ / CC License

There’s no denying that the media has latched onto a stereotype of what it is to be a “surfer girl.”

DAYLA SOUL: Like they’re bikini-clad, jumping off of waterfalls and listening to cool girly music, you know? And I wanted something a little more edgy, something a little more of the reality of who we are at Ocean Beach.

 

While some high-profile women--like Sheryl Sandberg at Facebook, or Marissa Meyer at Yahoo--have made it to the top of the tech world, few women are waiting to succeed them. In 2010, women earned JUST 18% of computer science degrees. And while women are the main users of online social networking and e-commerce, most leaders of these companies are men.

Women learn the art of a knock out

Apr 25, 2013
Impact Bay Area's website.

One Sunday afternoon at a fitness center in San Jose, a chorus of yelling and cheering can be heard: “Leave me alone. I don’t know this man. This man in the blue shirt is bothering me. Go away.”

It sounds like someone is being seriously threatened but instead it’s eight women demonstrating what they’ve learned after 22 hours of self defense training with Impact Bay Area, at the Morning Crane Healing Arts and Fitness Center.

www.gaurdian.co.uk

   

 

The December gang rape in Delhi spurred such huge protests in India, a surprised government had to act quickly.

Imagine having nowhere to sleep, now, imagine that reality if you’re older, and maybe you suffer from illness or decreased mobility.

Photo by Jim Forest on Flikr

If you really want to know how our local economy is doing, look no further than the nearest homeless shelter. Former Supervisor Bevan Dufty oversees homelessness in the city, and he says these days, San Francisco’s roughly 1,150 beds are nearly full each night. Advocates say there’s been a sharp increase in homeless seniors, especially women. It was rare to see this population on the streets a few decades ago, but now service providers say it seems to be the norm.

Courtesy of www.loveinshallah.com

Note to listeners: This interview contains mature content. 

San Francisco’s premier literary festival, Litquake, is in its final days, with dozens of readings, performances, and author events all over San Francisco.

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about why women submit fewer op-eds than men and how it affects public discourse. Katie Orenstein, founder of the OpEd Project, laments that we’re hearing from only a small fraction of the world’s best minds. What keeps women from writing op-eds and taking part in our public discourse? Join us at 10am PST or leave a comment here. Who are the female opinion writers you value --  and what do they offer? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Katie Orenstein, founder of the OpEd Project

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about the role of women in computer technology.  The proportion of undergraduate Computer Science degrees received by women in the US declined from 37% in 1985 to 22% in 2005.  Are women more afraid of technology?  Is it affecting their job prospects?  How are women innovating with computer science?  What would it take for more to get involved?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  Who are the women in the computer world that you admire?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guttmacher Institute

On today's Your Call we’ll honor International Women’s Day with a discussion about the status of women’s reproductive rights.  States enacted a record number of abortion restrictions in 2011, and they continue to come out.  Virginia just enacted a bill mandating ultrasound exams for women seeking abortions.  Why are women’s reproductive rights being targeted now?  And how are you responding?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests

Miss Representation is a new film about the rapid proliferation of media in the 21st Century and how it affects young boys and girls. The film notes that the reach of media today is unprecedented and more pervasive than ever before – and it may be presenting a very skewed portrayal of what it means to be female. Women are only 16 percent of the protagonists in movies and, Miss Representation argues, girls are encouraged by ads, TV and films to achieve an unrealistic standard of beauty at younger and younger ages. Here are some girls talking about how images are affecting them:

3Girls Theater sets the stage for female playwrights

Mar 5, 2012
Michael Bellino

The “3Girls” in the 3GirlsTheater are three experienced writers and theater personalities: Suze Allen, AJ Baker and Lee Brady. Their goal, according to Allen, is to put “women's work on stage where it belongs.”

At the moment, the cast and crew of “3Girls Theater” are in rehearsal. They are preparing for two plays: The Right Thing and What about Ben? – both written by Baker and Brady, and directed by Allen.

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