Back in 1992, toy company Mattel nearly had to recall its “Teen Talk” Barbie. Women’s groups protested the doll’s use of the phrase “Math class is tough.” They called it out for indirectly perpetuating a harmful stereotype-- that boys and men are better at math than girls and women. Research -- especially over the last 10 years -- has shown there is no innate difference in math ability between males and females. And yet the stereotype persists. Women earn 43% of all college math degrees, yet their presence is scarce in the higher echelons of mathematics.

Harvard College Observatory Collection of Astronomical Photographs

99% Invisible "Title TK" The name is important. It’s the first thing of any product you use or buy or see. The tip of the spear.  Only the names that are most interesting and most pleasant on the tongue can survive in your memory. So it’s no surprise that companies—especially large ones like Sony or Procter & Gamble—hire naming companies.

The Memory Palace: "400,000 Stars"

You've probably been seeing this next band around town for a while, on line-ups at clubs like Bottom of the Hill and The Independent. They've been playing the show circuit for over four years and have a following that stretches as far as London, England. 

What does gender have to do with science? The obvious answer is ‘nothing.’ Science is the epitome of an objective, rational, and disinterested enterprise. But has male dominance in science contributed certain unfounded assumptions or cognitive biases to the ‘objectivity’ of scientific inquiry? Is there any possibility of achieving a gender-neutral science, and if so, what would that look like?


While some high-profile women--like Sheryl Sandberg at Facebook, or Marissa Meyer at Yahoo--have made it to the top of the tech world, few women are waiting to succeed them. In 2010, women earned JUST 18% of computer science degrees. And while women are the main users of online social networking and e-commerce, most leaders of these companies are men.

Women learn the art of a knock out

Apr 25, 2013
Impact Bay Area's website.

One Sunday afternoon at a fitness center in San Jose, a chorus of yelling and cheering can be heard: “Leave me alone. I don’t know this man. This man in the blue shirt is bothering me. Go away.”

It sounds like someone is being seriously threatened but instead it’s eight women demonstrating what they’ve learned after 22 hours of self defense training with Impact Bay Area, at the Morning Crane Healing Arts and Fitness Center.




The December gang rape in Delhi spurred such huge protests in India, a surprised government had to act quickly.

Imagine having nowhere to sleep, now, imagine that reality if you’re older, and maybe you suffer from illness or decreased mobility.

Photo by Jim Forest on Flikr

If you really want to know how our local economy is doing, look no further than the nearest homeless shelter. Former Supervisor Bevan Dufty oversees homelessness in the city, and he says these days, San Francisco’s roughly 1,150 beds are nearly full each night. Advocates say there’s been a sharp increase in homeless seniors, especially women. It was rare to see this population on the streets a few decades ago, but now service providers say it seems to be the norm.

Courtesy of www.loveinshallah.com

Note to listeners: This interview contains mature content. 

San Francisco’s premier literary festival, Litquake, is in its final days, with dozens of readings, performances, and author events all over San Francisco.

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about why women submit fewer op-eds than men and how it affects public discourse. Katie Orenstein, founder of the OpEd Project, laments that we’re hearing from only a small fraction of the world’s best minds. What keeps women from writing op-eds and taking part in our public discourse? Join us at 10am PST or leave a comment here. Who are the female opinion writers you value --  and what do they offer? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.


Katie Orenstein, founder of the OpEd Project

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about the role of women in computer technology.  The proportion of undergraduate Computer Science degrees received by women in the US declined from 37% in 1985 to 22% in 2005.  Are women more afraid of technology?  Is it affecting their job prospects?  How are women innovating with computer science?  What would it take for more to get involved?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  Who are the women in the computer world that you admire?  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guttmacher Institute

On today's Your Call we’ll honor International Women’s Day with a discussion about the status of women’s reproductive rights.  States enacted a record number of abortion restrictions in 2011, and they continue to come out.  Virginia just enacted a bill mandating ultrasound exams for women seeking abortions.  Why are women’s reproductive rights being targeted now?  And how are you responding?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Miss Representation is a new film about the rapid proliferation of media in the 21st Century and how it affects young boys and girls. The film notes that the reach of media today is unprecedented and more pervasive than ever before – and it may be presenting a very skewed portrayal of what it means to be female. Women are only 16 percent of the protagonists in movies and, Miss Representation argues, girls are encouraged by ads, TV and films to achieve an unrealistic standard of beauty at younger and younger ages. Here are some girls talking about how images are affecting them:

3Girls Theater sets the stage for female playwrights

Mar 5, 2012
Michael Bellino

The “3Girls” in the 3GirlsTheater are three experienced writers and theater personalities: Suze Allen, AJ Baker and Lee Brady. Their goal, according to Allen, is to put “women's work on stage where it belongs.”

At the moment, the cast and crew of “3Girls Theater” are in rehearsal. They are preparing for two plays: The Right Thing and What about Ben? – both written by Baker and Brady, and directed by Allen.

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with the makers of the film, MissRepresentation, a documentary about the increasingly sexualized portrayals of women and girls in popular culture and news media and the continued absence of women in critical leadership roles.   How are these trends affecting our society--especially youth?  How do they impact you or those around you?  And how can we shift them?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.



On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about the status of women’s reproductive rights 39 years after Roe v. Wade legalized abortion.  Today’s political rhetoric is becoming more vitriolic over abortion. From personhood amendments to the closure of women’s clinics, what's happening at the state level across the country?  Who’s fighting back and how?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  What happened to the women’s movement of the 70s and the advances gained in women’s right to choose?   It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Photo courtesy of Rosenberg Foundation

Nationally, women are the fastest growing prison population. And one of the highest female prison populations in the world is here in California. That's slated to change under the state's new realignment program. The number of women in prison is supposed to shrink drastically, by as much as half, over the next few years.