World War II

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

Oakland writer Chizu Omori and her family were among the near 120,000 Japanese Americans forced to leave their homes and relocate to incarceration camps during World War II. Omori was just 12 years old when she was sent to Poston, a camp in the desert of Arizona.

Did you know that Richmond, Milpitas, and Palo Alto all had sub-divisions where it was illegal for African Americans to own a house? On this edition of Your Call, Richard Rothstein discusses The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, which details how laws and policy decisions promoted the very discriminatory patterns that continue today.

99% Invisible: The Giftschrank

Jan 28, 2018

In May 8, 1945, the Allied powers declared victory in Europe, putting an end to the Nazi regime. There was much to be done, and figuring out what to do with Mein Kampf (“My Struggle”), Adolf Hitler’s fictionalized autobiography, was prominently on the list.

This is a story about one of my very first teachers, Janet Daijogo. She’s the one who taught me how to tie my shoes and how to read my first book. I’m just one of hundreds of kids who’ve passed through her kindergarten classroom in the more than fifty years she’s taught.  

  

San Francisco is about to become the first major US city to honor and recognize more than 200,000 women and girls from 13 Asia-Pacific countries who were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese military during World War II.

Courtesy of Al Bronzini

 

“This is old Italian neighborhood,” Al Bronzini says. “That’s the house I was raised in, right there.” Al is showing me some of the places that were important to him growing up in East Oakland, almost 80 years ago. “Boy this is different,” he says. “Wow.”

Gen Fujitani

 

When President Trump signed an executive order last month banning people from seven Muslim countries from entering the U.S., and advocated a Muslim registry, some of the loudest opponents were Japanese Americans.

StoryCorps: An unsung WWII hero

Dec 12, 2016
StoryCorps

 

Bob Lauber is a World War II veteran who talked with his daughter, Jennifer Mascari about being stationed in France, smuggling food to local children there, and the time he met Charles de Gaulle.

 

Hear Here: Life lessons from Rutka Messinger

Apr 24, 2014

Rutka Messinger is a retired high school literature teacher living in San Francisco’s Richmond District. But, she wasn’t born here. She was actually born in a concentration camp in Siberia at the tail end of World War II. Both her parents survived the Holocaust. Soon after Messinger was born they fled the camp and began what she calls a long and complicated story. Her family ended up in Israel, where she lived until moving to the United States.

Here, Messinger says she sees beauty all around her – especially in her neighborhood. And she says if you look for good things, you’ll see them, too.

Melanie Young

If you read your history books, you might think that America’s involvement in the war against Japan began with the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.