youth

Eric Hannan was only supposed to work as the 81st Avenue Library's Teen Service Director for a few weeks. He ended up staying two years.

Tina Hayes School of Etiquette Class

California has been in an ongoing struggle trying to figure out how to deal with overcrowding in prisons. The problems extend to the Division of Juvenile Justice, where the state’s most serious young offenders are held. For youth from Alameda County, being sent to one of the DJJ facilities is one of the worst alternatives. They’re spread out all over the state, which means it can be hard to keep family connections, and complaints of abuse and unsafe conditions have dogged the system for more than a decade.

Approaching juvenile crime head on

Aug 15, 2013
Sara Brooke Curtis

When people get into trouble with the law, they normally don’t have a chance to have a conversation with their victims. To explain what happened. Hear about the damage they caused. Say they’re sorry. But there’s a growing trend to try and make that happen, so both parties can move on.

Bridging the Opportunity Divide in the Bay Area

Jun 18, 2013

What happens to young people in the Bay Area with no college degree? How can they navigate a labor market that demands high tech skills without adequate education or training? Producer and guest host Victoria Thorp and guests explore new strategies for addressing the opportunity divide in the Bay Area.

Guests:

East Bay Express: A people-focused solution

May 23, 2013

Students at Montera Middle School in Oakland said the school's eighth-grade class was full of "drama" earlier this year. There had been a fight between two girls, and the conflict had broadened to the girls' friends. Some students "were coming to school in sweats, ready to fight," recalled Yari Ojeda-Sandel, a staffer at Montera who coordinates the school's new conflict-resolution program known as restorative justice.

Making sense of California youth sentences

Oct 18, 2012

For juveniles in California being sentenced for crimes, things just got a little more complicated. Proposition 21 requires mandatory minimums for juveniles that often translate into long sentences. In California alone, there are hundreds of inmates serving juvenile sentences totaling between 50 and 200 years. Advocates argue that these sentences are the equivalent of life without parole. This summer, the State Supreme Court agreed and ruled that unusually long sentences for juveniles unconstitutional.

On today's Your Call, we’ll speak with Jennifer Tilton, author of Dangerous or Endangered? Race and the Politics of Youth in Urban America. She says “We are afraid for our own kids, but deeply fearful of other people’s children.”  What can we do about what Tilton calls our “nation of radically unequal childhoods”?  Join us at 10am PST or post a comment here.  How do communities change when there are resources available to youth? It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests:

Lorenzo Bynum has the “baller" build you might see on the cover of GQ, without the swagger. He’s clean-cut, 5’10”, wears two small earrings and has a muscular frame. It’s a Wednesday afternoon in Marin City, and the 23-year-old is digging frantically through a 10’ by 10’ closet. He’s hunting for a parachute large enough for a game with 15 third graders.

Wednesdays are busy days for Bynum. He clocks in at three part-time jobs: two hours directing elementary school children, two hours coaching track and field, and two hours coaching middle school boys basketball.

From the projects to the putting green

Jun 12, 2012

The Visitacion Valley Middle School is located in the southern part of San Francisco – one of the poorest residential areas of the city. It's recess and kids are outside playing the typical sports: football, basketball. But at this school, there's also golf.

Tony Anderson, Visitacion Valley's site director, works with 20 to 30 kids every day at the schools practice range. One is a 13-year-old named Faletui Manu. “Manu is one of our students who's been with us. He's just walked up to practice on his little chip here,” says Anderson, before congratulating Manu on a nice shot.

A few weeks ago, we aired a story about San Francisco students' access to public transportation. The piece discussed possible legislation that would provide free Muni passes to local youth. Here are some responses that came through the Crosscurrents voicemail line.

A peek into the secret world of girls

Mar 5, 2012

Imagine for a moment that you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, say at about age nine. What would have been your biggest dreams? Favorite color? Best friends? What would you hope to never forget as a grown up? These are just a few of the questions that KALW’s Martina Castro posed to three 4th grade girls, all friends and classmates at the Park Day School in Oakland. They attend an after school art and mindfulness class at Honey Moon Studios.

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