Sights and Sounds of Bayview

The Sights and Sounds of Bayview is a project of KALW and the San Francisco Arts Commission to tell the stories of the people who live, work, and have a positive impact on San Francisco's Bayview neighborhood. Radio producers and photographers documented the stories in sound and imagery.

The first Sights and Sounds event took place September 19, 2013. Stories were presented live on stage at the historic Bayview Opera House in front of an audience of local community members and newcomers to the neighborhood.

The second Sights and Sounds event took place June 19, 2015. Stories were presented live on stage at the Joseph Lee Recreation Center in Bayview.

Hear and view the completed stories below.

High up on a hill in San Francisco's Hunter's Point neighborhood is a tiny two-bedroom apartment. From the outside it looks like any other building on the block. But as you approach, the sound of laughing, yelling, stomping, squealing, and music can be heard spilling out of the door and windows. 

Gathered inside is a group of black girls. They're old friends, new friends, cousins, sisters, neighbors, and strangers. Every day after school, nearly 30 of them make their way here to be part of a makeshift, girls-only clubhouse called Girls 2000.

Here, the girls can learn to cook for themselves. They help each other with homework. They work on art projects. They talk about boys. And they learn how to grow.

Michael Zelner

It’s Thursday, and do you know what you’re doing this weekend? If you don’t, fear not: I’ve got a list of go-to events that are open to everyone.

TaSin Sabir

Bayview has long been known as San Francisco’s industrial hub. But on Yosemite Street there’s an imposing brick building with a dance studio. Inside the space there's a group of young people who climb on pieces of welded iron that hang three feet off the ground. They run and mess around with each other during breaks. But their joviality turns to concentration when they get in the air. Up there they’re spinning, floating, and thriving.

Kyung Jin Lee

Sixty-eight-year-old Oscar James stands on a hill overlooking the old Hunters Point Shipyard. He points out a street that’s now closed off by a chain-link fence. That’s where his family lived on a street once called Navy Road. There’s a striking view of the bay side of the peninsula.

“All that dirt, see it behind the lab, the road?” he asks. “From that road all the way back used to be water.”

Kevin Jones

 

This isn’t the story of another police shooting. It’s the story of what happens after a police shooting. Especially one in particular.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

Join KALW at the Joseph Lee Recreation Center on Friday, June 19 at 7 p.m. for an evening of storytelling, live music, and dance.

The second Sights and Sounds of Bayview will be hosted by Crosscurrents’ Hana Baba. The event will feature stories about the remarkable people who live, work, and make a positive impact in the neighborhood. Sights and Sounds of Bayview is part of 3rd on Third, presented by the Bayview Opera House. The event is made possible by the San Francisco Arts Commission and the San Francisco Public Utilities Company and sponsored by Independent Arts and Media. 

RSVP on our Facebook event page here!

TaSin Sabir

The sun is beating down on Islais Creek, a small marine channel in Hunters Point that opens out into the Bay. Homeless camps, graffiti, and factories surround the area, but there’s also a small, quaint park with native cherry trees and a gravel boat launch. Bo Barnes, a laid back man with shoulder length hair and an easy smile, is getting ready to take me out kayaking on Islais Creek.

Kevin B. Jones

Watch:

Like many people who see a pretty rose in bloom, Annette Smith likes to take in the sight and scent of it. But when she bends her head to inhale this particular rose’s fragrance, her enjoyment comes with a deeper meaning – she remembers where this rosebush came from, and how and when it was planted here.

Pernilla Persson

Watch:

On a wide street full of work spaces, lined with cars and no trees in sight is the Dr. George W. Davis Senior Center. It’s the one building on the block where there’s constant activity. Laughter pours out of the cafeteria which for now has been turned into a dance floor. 

R.J. Lozada

Watch: 

Deafening gunshots rang out just as James Martin arrived home. Troubled by the news of a 17-year-old young man dying in front of his house, he did what anyone would do – actually what most wouldn’t do. He grabbed his portable karaoke machine and stood at the sidewalk memorial erected for the young man and began singing, “Wake up everybody, no more sleeping in bed, no more backward thinking time for thinking ahead.”

Pernilla Persson

Watch:

  

San Francisco’s Bayview neighborhood has one of the highest concentrations of people ages 17 or younger in the city of San Francisco. Juana Teresa Tello is working to train these young people to be activists in their community.

Malaika Kambon

Listen:

 Watch:

At first glance, Raquel Miller has more than a few things in common with a Hollywood heiress. She wears her hair in long, soft curls or braids and she carries a bedazzled hello kitty iPhone case that matches her neon pink Nikes.

Laura Flynn

Watch:  

Kevin B. Jones

Watch:

 

Having Pride rolls up to the plaza at Third and Oakdale with a mission: hit the bricks, and tell everyone they meet about the group’s job placement, food assistance, and GED programs.