StoryCorps

StoryCorps partners with the San Francisco Public Library to record, preserve, and share the stories of communities in San Francisco.

StoryCorps

Storycorps

 

 

From time to time, the StoryCorps team goes mobile, and collects interviews at specific sites around the Bay Area. This piece is part of a series of interviews that took place at Highland Hospital in East Oakland.

StoryCorps: Coit Tower's Murals at 80

Oct 14, 2013
BriYYZ / 2010

Last week marked the 80th birthday of one of San Francisco’s grandest landmarks: Coit Tower. Inside the iconic structure are several colorful murals depicting themes of labor and life in California during the Great Depression. A group of master artists went to work on these murals in 1934 as part of the Public Works of Art Project. The program was part of the federal government’s effort to put people back to work, a precursor to the creation of the Works Progress Administration. 

The year 1934 also marked the controversial West Coast Waterfront Strike, which helped usher in the national organized labor movement. Violence broke out during the strike, and controversy over the radical content in some of the murals ensued. Some of the most contentious scenes were painted over. Bernard Zakheim was one of the Coit Tower muralists, and his daughter Ruth Gottstein remembers the strike in this interview with San Francisco StoryCorps. 

advencap / Creative Commons


Sitawa Natambu Jamaa has been incarcerated for 33 years at the Pelican Bay State Prison in Crescent City; 23 of them in the Security Housing Unit, also known as the SHU. He spends most of his time—up to 22 hours a day—in a small, windowless cell. His charge is murder, though his sister Marie Levin says he did not commit the crime.

Pages